Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187943
Title:
SOCIAL CLASS AND VIOLENT BEHAVIOR (DELINQUENCY).
Author:
BROWNFIELD, DAVID HAROLD.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to specify more precisely the relationship between social class and crime or delinquency by focusing on a particular offense, violent behavior. Police records and survey data from four studies are analyzed. These data sets are derived from samples from around the United States and span nearly a twenty-year period. The empirical analysis begins by examining the relationship between parental status and violent behavior. One of the principal conclusions drawn from this analysis is that the magnitude of the relationship between social class and violent behavior is contingent upon the way class or status is defined or measured. Depending upon the way class is operationalized, its relationship with violent behavior is nonexistent, moderate, or relatively strong. To account for this social distribution of violent behavior, four major theories of crime and delinquency are tested. Structural and cultural theories in general fail to provide an adequate explanation. For example, consistent with research on general delinquent behavior, there is almost no support for the propositions of strain theory. In contrast, processual and psychological theories of crime and delinquency receive considerable support. Social learning theory measures of imitation are among the strongest correlates of violent behavior. In one data set, imitation measures completely account for the class distribution of violence. Social control theory measures, such as attachment to others, are also strongly correlated with violent behavior. A series of crucial experiments comparing control theory propositions with predictions of other theories yield results more consistent with control theory. The relationship between adolescent status and violent behavior is also examined. Parallel to the analysis of parental status, the results vary depending on the measure of adolescent status used. These results suggest that there are distinct dimensions of adolescent status which must be assessed separately.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Social classes.; Violence.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jensen, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSOCIAL CLASS AND VIOLENT BEHAVIOR (DELINQUENCY).en_US
dc.creatorBROWNFIELD, DAVID HAROLD.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBROWNFIELD, DAVID HAROLD.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to specify more precisely the relationship between social class and crime or delinquency by focusing on a particular offense, violent behavior. Police records and survey data from four studies are analyzed. These data sets are derived from samples from around the United States and span nearly a twenty-year period. The empirical analysis begins by examining the relationship between parental status and violent behavior. One of the principal conclusions drawn from this analysis is that the magnitude of the relationship between social class and violent behavior is contingent upon the way class or status is defined or measured. Depending upon the way class is operationalized, its relationship with violent behavior is nonexistent, moderate, or relatively strong. To account for this social distribution of violent behavior, four major theories of crime and delinquency are tested. Structural and cultural theories in general fail to provide an adequate explanation. For example, consistent with research on general delinquent behavior, there is almost no support for the propositions of strain theory. In contrast, processual and psychological theories of crime and delinquency receive considerable support. Social learning theory measures of imitation are among the strongest correlates of violent behavior. In one data set, imitation measures completely account for the class distribution of violence. Social control theory measures, such as attachment to others, are also strongly correlated with violent behavior. A series of crucial experiments comparing control theory propositions with predictions of other theories yield results more consistent with control theory. The relationship between adolescent status and violent behavior is also examined. Parallel to the analysis of parental status, the results vary depending on the measure of adolescent status used. These results suggest that there are distinct dimensions of adolescent status which must be assessed separately.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSocial classes.en_US
dc.subjectViolence.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJensen, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirschi, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBorhek, J. T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8514902en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693614488en_US
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