HERITABILITY OF TOLERANCE TO SIMAZINE IN GIANT BERMUDAGRASS (CYNODON DACTYLON L. PERS. VAR. ARIDUS HARLAN ET DE WET) (RESISTANCE, AMETRYN, INHERITANCE).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187896
Title:
HERITABILITY OF TOLERANCE TO SIMAZINE IN GIANT BERMUDAGRASS (CYNODON DACTYLON L. PERS. VAR. ARIDUS HARLAN ET DE WET) (RESISTANCE, AMETRYN, INHERITANCE).
Author:
GREEN, JOHN MANTLE.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Five clones of giant type bermudagrass, Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers. vars. aridus and afghanicus Harlan et de Wet, progenies from crosses among those five, and crossed, selfed, and open pollination progeny from selected F₁ plants were evaluated for response to simazine (2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine). The first two generations were also evaluated for their response to ametryn (2-(ethylamino)-4-(isopropylamino)-6-(methylthio)-s-triazine). Two techniques were used. Culm cuttings, rooted in wet vermiculite, were placed into test tubes of simazine or ametryn suspensions at various concentrations or water. Culms were rated (1 to 9, 9 normal, 1 dead) for herbicide injury. Seeds were placed into petri dishes on moist filter paper, germinated in a germinator (day 35C, night 21C) and treated with 8ppm simazine or water in a greenhouse. Seedlings were rated visually for herbicide injury (7 normal, 5 affected, 1 dead) weekly, later daily, until a final drying and weighing of seedlings after all those in simazine were dead. Tolerance of all treated materials was expressed as percentage of control. There were significant differences among plants in tolerance to simazine with significance up to .001, although there was great variance within genotypes affected. The correlation between ametryn and simazine reaction was low. Tolerance scores were affected by condition of culms (significance .05), dosage, and nutrient levels. The clone by nutrient level interaction was significant at .01. Tolerance to simazine varied widely (more than 60%) among progeny of any plant as maternal parent. Progeny of reciprocal crosses between resistant and susceptible clones had similar (45 to 46) mean tolerance scores intermediate between parental scores indicating no dominance. Plants with the same cytoplasm ranged from most resistant (88%) to most susceptible (11%). Maternal effect on tolerance appears absent. The range of response for progeny of parents of any tolerance level indicates several pairs of genes are involved. Open pollination seedlings from consistently resistant plants averaged more resistant than seedlings from consistently susceptible plants. Giant bermudagrass simazine tolerance must be quantitatively inherited, possibly additive, with penetrance varying with plant condition, dosage, and other environmental constraints.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Bermuda grass -- Genetics.; Herbicide resistance.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kneebone, W. R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHERITABILITY OF TOLERANCE TO SIMAZINE IN GIANT BERMUDAGRASS (CYNODON DACTYLON L. PERS. VAR. ARIDUS HARLAN ET DE WET) (RESISTANCE, AMETRYN, INHERITANCE).en_US
dc.creatorGREEN, JOHN MANTLE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGREEN, JOHN MANTLE.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFive clones of giant type bermudagrass, Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers. vars. aridus and afghanicus Harlan et de Wet, progenies from crosses among those five, and crossed, selfed, and open pollination progeny from selected F₁ plants were evaluated for response to simazine (2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine). The first two generations were also evaluated for their response to ametryn (2-(ethylamino)-4-(isopropylamino)-6-(methylthio)-s-triazine). Two techniques were used. Culm cuttings, rooted in wet vermiculite, were placed into test tubes of simazine or ametryn suspensions at various concentrations or water. Culms were rated (1 to 9, 9 normal, 1 dead) for herbicide injury. Seeds were placed into petri dishes on moist filter paper, germinated in a germinator (day 35C, night 21C) and treated with 8ppm simazine or water in a greenhouse. Seedlings were rated visually for herbicide injury (7 normal, 5 affected, 1 dead) weekly, later daily, until a final drying and weighing of seedlings after all those in simazine were dead. Tolerance of all treated materials was expressed as percentage of control. There were significant differences among plants in tolerance to simazine with significance up to .001, although there was great variance within genotypes affected. The correlation between ametryn and simazine reaction was low. Tolerance scores were affected by condition of culms (significance .05), dosage, and nutrient levels. The clone by nutrient level interaction was significant at .01. Tolerance to simazine varied widely (more than 60%) among progeny of any plant as maternal parent. Progeny of reciprocal crosses between resistant and susceptible clones had similar (45 to 46) mean tolerance scores intermediate between parental scores indicating no dominance. Plants with the same cytoplasm ranged from most resistant (88%) to most susceptible (11%). Maternal effect on tolerance appears absent. The range of response for progeny of parents of any tolerance level indicates several pairs of genes are involved. Open pollination seedlings from consistently resistant plants averaged more resistant than seedlings from consistently susceptible plants. Giant bermudagrass simazine tolerance must be quantitatively inherited, possibly additive, with penetrance varying with plant condition, dosage, and other environmental constraints.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBermuda grass -- Genetics.en_US
dc.subjectHerbicide resistance.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKneebone, W. R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDobrenz, A. K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchonhorst, M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamilton, K. C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBartels, P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8506959en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693591803en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.