COMPUTER-ASSISTED AND TRADITIONAL METHODS OF TEXT ANALYSIS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF EAST AND WEST GERMAN NEWSPAPER LANGUAGE (SOCIOLINGUISTICS, TEXT LINGUISTICS).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187885
Title:
COMPUTER-ASSISTED AND TRADITIONAL METHODS OF TEXT ANALYSIS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF EAST AND WEST GERMAN NEWSPAPER LANGUAGE (SOCIOLINGUISTICS, TEXT LINGUISTICS).
Author:
KEMPF, RENATE UTA.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation uses a variety of approaches to investigate the language in two newspapers from the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). Each approach can give insights into the question of possible language differences, and eventually the authors' intentions and their ideological background will prove to be more relevant than their geographic origin. A comparative study of metaphors shows how certain recurrent metaphors are used to influence the readers' conceptual reality. While the actual effect of these metaphors cannot be determined, their use reveals the intentions of the authors. An investigation of pronouns and terms of address successfully applies sociolinguistic methods to written texts. A study of letters, speeches, and interviews proves that there is in some cases a conflict between the prescribed norm of an informal pronoun and speaker intuition. The concept of a very narrowly defined part of the language, a Textsorte, is used in an investigation of death notices. Notices from the FRG and GDR show great similarity in phrasing. Differences in content can be explained by the different social realities. Finally, a computer-assisted investigation of word formation and new words yields a small number of new words and shows how the content of a text influences the language, even on the level of the affixes that are used. Suffixes and words that stress collectivity are significantly more frequent in the GDR newspaper, while affixes and words expressing something negative are used more often in the newspaper from the FRG. We can see that various methods can give insights into various aspects of language, and benefits and problems of each method are discussed. Finally, we come to realize that the fear of language separation is unfounded, but that author intention has a greater influence on texts than one might expect.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
German language -- Comparison.; German language -- Variation.; German language -- Gemination.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Linguistics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lehrer, Adrienne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCOMPUTER-ASSISTED AND TRADITIONAL METHODS OF TEXT ANALYSIS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF EAST AND WEST GERMAN NEWSPAPER LANGUAGE (SOCIOLINGUISTICS, TEXT LINGUISTICS).en_US
dc.creatorKEMPF, RENATE UTA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKEMPF, RENATE UTA.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation uses a variety of approaches to investigate the language in two newspapers from the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). Each approach can give insights into the question of possible language differences, and eventually the authors' intentions and their ideological background will prove to be more relevant than their geographic origin. A comparative study of metaphors shows how certain recurrent metaphors are used to influence the readers' conceptual reality. While the actual effect of these metaphors cannot be determined, their use reveals the intentions of the authors. An investigation of pronouns and terms of address successfully applies sociolinguistic methods to written texts. A study of letters, speeches, and interviews proves that there is in some cases a conflict between the prescribed norm of an informal pronoun and speaker intuition. The concept of a very narrowly defined part of the language, a Textsorte, is used in an investigation of death notices. Notices from the FRG and GDR show great similarity in phrasing. Differences in content can be explained by the different social realities. Finally, a computer-assisted investigation of word formation and new words yields a small number of new words and shows how the content of a text influences the language, even on the level of the affixes that are used. Suffixes and words that stress collectivity are significantly more frequent in the GDR newspaper, while affixes and words expressing something negative are used more often in the newspaper from the FRG. We can see that various methods can give insights into various aspects of language, and benefits and problems of each method are discussed. Finally, we come to realize that the fear of language separation is unfounded, but that author intention has a greater influence on texts than one might expect.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGerman language -- Comparison.en_US
dc.subjectGerman language -- Variation.en_US
dc.subjectGerman language -- Gemination.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLehrer, Adrienneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChisholm, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest8505233en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693373224en_US
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