Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187875
Title:
SELECTED ATTRIBUTES OF MALE PRIMARY TEACHERS IN ARIZONA.
Author:
BROWN, ALBERT.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to develop a profile of the male primary teacher in Arizona. It was hoped that such research would provide practical information for Arizona's teacher education programs for the purpose of attracting qualified males into teaching as well as for school districts who wish to attract and maintain qualified male primary teachers. The study population consisted of 112 primary teachers (K-3) in the public school systems of Arizona. Data for this study was obtained by the questionnaire method. The questionnaire designed for this study was based on a review of the literature. Data was gathered that pertained to three areas: Personal Attributes, Professional Attributes, and Perceived Contributions. The typical male primary teacher in Arizona is Anglo, 36, and married to a working wife. He is likely to be a first born, born out of Arizona, and not the first in the family to go to college. Most were born into a middle- or working-class family and were reared in a traditional family in that the mother's main occupation was that of a housewife. The typical male primary teacher in Arizona is likely to have a master's degree, and over half have an undergraduate degree in primary education. The majority received their degree from an Arizona institution. He is likely to be teaching in the third grade and has previously taught at the primary level. Well over half reported professional membership and have attended a professional conference within the past six months to a year. Most, however, do not belong to a professional support group. Low salaries was the most reported career impediment, and less than half see opportunities for advancement. A majority plan to continue teaching at the primary level, while some plan to teach at the intermediate level. The typical male primary teacher feels accepted by students, parents, and female colleagues. They see the public as having a more positive attitude towards men who teach grades K-3. Over half see themselves as helpful with discipline problems and effective when conferring with parents. They also see themselves as effective motivators and offering their students a different learning experience. A little over half agree that they are a father substitute and that children should have a male primary teacher. Well over half do not think boys benefit more than girls do from having a male primary teacher. Most think the elementary schools should be defeminized. Most think their school administration values their teaching at the primary level.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Elementary school teachers -- Arizona -- Psychology.; Elementary school teachers -- Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Elementary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Carswell, Evelyn M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSELECTED ATTRIBUTES OF MALE PRIMARY TEACHERS IN ARIZONA.en_US
dc.creatorBROWN, ALBERT.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBROWN, ALBERT.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to develop a profile of the male primary teacher in Arizona. It was hoped that such research would provide practical information for Arizona's teacher education programs for the purpose of attracting qualified males into teaching as well as for school districts who wish to attract and maintain qualified male primary teachers. The study population consisted of 112 primary teachers (K-3) in the public school systems of Arizona. Data for this study was obtained by the questionnaire method. The questionnaire designed for this study was based on a review of the literature. Data was gathered that pertained to three areas: Personal Attributes, Professional Attributes, and Perceived Contributions. The typical male primary teacher in Arizona is Anglo, 36, and married to a working wife. He is likely to be a first born, born out of Arizona, and not the first in the family to go to college. Most were born into a middle- or working-class family and were reared in a traditional family in that the mother's main occupation was that of a housewife. The typical male primary teacher in Arizona is likely to have a master's degree, and over half have an undergraduate degree in primary education. The majority received their degree from an Arizona institution. He is likely to be teaching in the third grade and has previously taught at the primary level. Well over half reported professional membership and have attended a professional conference within the past six months to a year. Most, however, do not belong to a professional support group. Low salaries was the most reported career impediment, and less than half see opportunities for advancement. A majority plan to continue teaching at the primary level, while some plan to teach at the intermediate level. The typical male primary teacher feels accepted by students, parents, and female colleagues. They see the public as having a more positive attitude towards men who teach grades K-3. Over half see themselves as helpful with discipline problems and effective when conferring with parents. They also see themselves as effective motivators and offering their students a different learning experience. A little over half agree that they are a father substitute and that children should have a male primary teacher. Well over half do not think boys benefit more than girls do from having a male primary teacher. Most think the elementary schools should be defeminized. Most think their school administration values their teaching at the primary level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectElementary school teachers -- Arizona -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectElementary school teachers -- Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElementary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCarswell, Evelyn M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8505224en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693384082en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.