FACTORS AFFECTING THE SELECTION OF FEMALE VERSUS MALE PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS (PERCEPTION, WOMEN).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187864
Title:
FACTORS AFFECTING THE SELECTION OF FEMALE VERSUS MALE PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS (PERCEPTION, WOMEN).
Author:
SANCHEZ, VIRGINIA VASQUEZ.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study was undertaken to identify factors which lead to the selection of females as public school superintendents. Previous studies in current literature appeared to concentrate on negative aspects of female exclusion in administration. Four categories encompassing possible influential factors were studied. Those categories were, (1) family influence, (2) role models, (3) motivation, and (4) personal characteristics. In order to compare female perception of these factors, a random sample of male superintendents was selected to determine whether perceptions were similar or different from those of the female superintendents. In the family influence category, the male and female sample population considered themselves most like their fathers in character and personality while a smaller percentage of male and female respondents indicated a similarity to their mothers. In the Role Model category, both male and female superintendents generally attributed their career decisions to the influence of family and non-family role models, sponsors, and mentors. In the Motivation category, both sexes appeared to be highly motivated by the desire to influence policy, and to better themselves. The majority of both sexes also agreed that they have not yet reached their ultimate career goals in educational administration. In the category of Personal Characteristics, there was little, if any, difference between male and female respondents. The male and female superintendents, as separate and combined groups, ranked four personal characteristics in the same order of importance: (1) qualifications, (2) administration experience, (3) knowledge, and (4) education. On the whole, there does not seem to be a significant difference in any of the categories; however, in specific items within each category a significant difference can be observed. Several conclusions can be drawn following this study. Because existing literature on positive influential factors is limited, this can be considered a new area. The researcher is hesitant to generalize from the conclusions about the entire public school superintendent population. The literature reveals several studies have been done to find personal characteristics common to male and female administrators. Finally, one might conclude that most of the population of superintendents may be found to have the same characteristics.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
School superintendents and principals -- Psychology.; Women executives -- Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nelson, L. O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFACTORS AFFECTING THE SELECTION OF FEMALE VERSUS MALE PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS (PERCEPTION, WOMEN).en_US
dc.creatorSANCHEZ, VIRGINIA VASQUEZ.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSANCHEZ, VIRGINIA VASQUEZ.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study was undertaken to identify factors which lead to the selection of females as public school superintendents. Previous studies in current literature appeared to concentrate on negative aspects of female exclusion in administration. Four categories encompassing possible influential factors were studied. Those categories were, (1) family influence, (2) role models, (3) motivation, and (4) personal characteristics. In order to compare female perception of these factors, a random sample of male superintendents was selected to determine whether perceptions were similar or different from those of the female superintendents. In the family influence category, the male and female sample population considered themselves most like their fathers in character and personality while a smaller percentage of male and female respondents indicated a similarity to their mothers. In the Role Model category, both male and female superintendents generally attributed their career decisions to the influence of family and non-family role models, sponsors, and mentors. In the Motivation category, both sexes appeared to be highly motivated by the desire to influence policy, and to better themselves. The majority of both sexes also agreed that they have not yet reached their ultimate career goals in educational administration. In the category of Personal Characteristics, there was little, if any, difference between male and female respondents. The male and female superintendents, as separate and combined groups, ranked four personal characteristics in the same order of importance: (1) qualifications, (2) administration experience, (3) knowledge, and (4) education. On the whole, there does not seem to be a significant difference in any of the categories; however, in specific items within each category a significant difference can be observed. Several conclusions can be drawn following this study. Because existing literature on positive influential factors is limited, this can be considered a new area. The researcher is hesitant to generalize from the conclusions about the entire public school superintendent population. The literature reveals several studies have been done to find personal characteristics common to male and female administrators. Finally, one might conclude that most of the population of superintendents may be found to have the same characteristics.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSchool superintendents and principals -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectWomen executives -- Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNelson, L. O.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8504757en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693373085en_US
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