PERCEPTIONS OF PSYCHODYNAMICS DURING A TRANSITIONAL PERIOD AS REPORTED IN FAMILIES AFFECTED BY ALCOHOLISM.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187854
Title:
PERCEPTIONS OF PSYCHODYNAMICS DURING A TRANSITIONAL PERIOD AS REPORTED IN FAMILIES AFFECTED BY ALCOHOLISM.
Author:
BONK, JAMES RAYMOND.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of the purposes of the study was to obtain information on how family members' perceptions of the family's homeostasis changes over time as the family passes from a crisis period through a transition phase from a wet (drinking) to a dry (non-drinking) state. In addition, the study examined the impact that changes in the family system may have on maintaining a dry state after the completion of an alcoholism treatment program that involved family members. Twenty families participated in the study. Family members completed instruments that measured family cohesion, adaptability, dynamics, satisfaction, and family/social functioning at three different measurement occasions. Those measurement occasions were at the beginning (Time 1) and completion (Time 2) of a family treatment program for alcoholism, and at a month follow-up (Time 3). The primary test for each hypothesis was a repeated measures analysis of variance where the within subject factor was the measurement occasions (Time). In general, the results of the study suggested that a month follow-up, the families were still in a disrupted state of homeostasis as reflected in the scores for adaptability, cohesion, and dynamics. However, the findings of the study indicated that the families were more satisfied with the family system at the time of follow-up than at the beginning of a family program. In addition, family members reported being more involved in activities with each other at the follow-up period than at the start of a family program.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Alcoholics -- Family relationships.; Alcoholics -- Rehabilitation.; Interpersonal relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Smith, Mae

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePERCEPTIONS OF PSYCHODYNAMICS DURING A TRANSITIONAL PERIOD AS REPORTED IN FAMILIES AFFECTED BY ALCOHOLISM.en_US
dc.creatorBONK, JAMES RAYMOND.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBONK, JAMES RAYMOND.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne of the purposes of the study was to obtain information on how family members' perceptions of the family's homeostasis changes over time as the family passes from a crisis period through a transition phase from a wet (drinking) to a dry (non-drinking) state. In addition, the study examined the impact that changes in the family system may have on maintaining a dry state after the completion of an alcoholism treatment program that involved family members. Twenty families participated in the study. Family members completed instruments that measured family cohesion, adaptability, dynamics, satisfaction, and family/social functioning at three different measurement occasions. Those measurement occasions were at the beginning (Time 1) and completion (Time 2) of a family treatment program for alcoholism, and at a month follow-up (Time 3). The primary test for each hypothesis was a repeated measures analysis of variance where the within subject factor was the measurement occasions (Time). In general, the results of the study suggested that a month follow-up, the families were still in a disrupted state of homeostasis as reflected in the scores for adaptability, cohesion, and dynamics. However, the findings of the study indicated that the families were more satisfied with the family system at the time of follow-up than at the beginning of a family program. In addition, family members reported being more involved in activities with each other at the follow-up period than at the start of a family program.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAlcoholics -- Family relationships.en_US
dc.subjectAlcoholics -- Rehabilitation.en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSmith, Maeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDowney, Billen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrganist, Jimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCord, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishel, Merleen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8504749en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693591938en_US
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