ASSESSMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH HEMODIALYSIS: ANALYSIS OF PATIENT AND MEDICAL STAFF PERCEPTIONS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187845
Title:
ASSESSMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH HEMODIALYSIS: ANALYSIS OF PATIENT AND MEDICAL STAFF PERCEPTIONS.
Author:
West, Colleen Martha Makin
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study assessed the psychological problems associated with hemodialysis and included an investigation of the differences and similarities between (1) dialysis patients' and medical staff's perceptions of patients' problems, and (2) the problems of hemodialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients. Data were collected from 31 adult hemodialysis patients, 34 dialysis medical staff and 32 spinal cord injury patients at the Miami, Florida Veterans Administration Medical Center. The scaling technique of magnitude estimation was used to measure patients' and staff's perceptions of the relative seriousness of various illness-related problems. Depression and anxiety in hemodialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients were measured by standardized self-report inventories. Among the most significant findings were that: (1) Dialysis patients judged problems concerning lifestyle changes (e.g., inability to travel and work) and loss of body function (e.g., reduced levels of physical activity) to be more serious or emotionally distressing than other problems they experienced. (2) Dialysis patients and medical staff differed significantly in their perceptions of the seriousness of most problems associated with hemodialysis; moreover, there was less agreement between patients and physicians than between patients and other types of staff (e.g., nurses and technicians). (3) There were no significant differences between dialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients in their scaled problem judgments. (4) Depression in hemodialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients was greater than for the general population, with the majority of both patient groups meeting criteria for diagnosis of clinical depression. In addition, although dialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients did not differ significantly in their total mean depression scores, dialysis patients endorsed somatic components of depression more frequently and/or with greater intensity than spinal cord injury patients did. (5) Anxiety in dialysis patients was not greater than for the general population and was significantly less than for spinal cord injury patients. (6) Depression and anxiety were positively related to most problems for hemodialysis patients, while anxiety, but not depression, was significantly associated with most problems for spinal cord injury patients. A major contribution of this study is the comparison, for the first time, of patients' and medical staff's scaled problem judgments.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Hemodialysis -- Patients.; Hemodialysis -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Arkowitz, Harold S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleASSESSMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH HEMODIALYSIS: ANALYSIS OF PATIENT AND MEDICAL STAFF PERCEPTIONS.en_US
dc.creatorWest, Colleen Martha Makinen_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Colleen Martha Makinen_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the psychological problems associated with hemodialysis and included an investigation of the differences and similarities between (1) dialysis patients' and medical staff's perceptions of patients' problems, and (2) the problems of hemodialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients. Data were collected from 31 adult hemodialysis patients, 34 dialysis medical staff and 32 spinal cord injury patients at the Miami, Florida Veterans Administration Medical Center. The scaling technique of magnitude estimation was used to measure patients' and staff's perceptions of the relative seriousness of various illness-related problems. Depression and anxiety in hemodialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients were measured by standardized self-report inventories. Among the most significant findings were that: (1) Dialysis patients judged problems concerning lifestyle changes (e.g., inability to travel and work) and loss of body function (e.g., reduced levels of physical activity) to be more serious or emotionally distressing than other problems they experienced. (2) Dialysis patients and medical staff differed significantly in their perceptions of the seriousness of most problems associated with hemodialysis; moreover, there was less agreement between patients and physicians than between patients and other types of staff (e.g., nurses and technicians). (3) There were no significant differences between dialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients in their scaled problem judgments. (4) Depression in hemodialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients was greater than for the general population, with the majority of both patient groups meeting criteria for diagnosis of clinical depression. In addition, although dialysis patients and spinal cord injury patients did not differ significantly in their total mean depression scores, dialysis patients endorsed somatic components of depression more frequently and/or with greater intensity than spinal cord injury patients did. (5) Anxiety in dialysis patients was not greater than for the general population and was significantly less than for spinal cord injury patients. (6) Depression and anxiety were positively related to most problems for hemodialysis patients, while anxiety, but not depression, was significantly associated with most problems for spinal cord injury patients. A major contribution of this study is the comparison, for the first time, of patients' and medical staff's scaled problem judgments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHemodialysis -- Patients.en_US
dc.subjectHemodialysis -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScheiber, Stephen C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShanfield, Stephen B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMadison, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBechtel, Robert B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8504137en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693408077en_US
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