THE EFFECTS OF PASSIVE IMMUNITY ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL IN THE DAIRY HEIFER (IMMUNOGLOBULINS, MORBIDITY, NEONATE, MORTALITY, COLOSTRUM).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187839
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF PASSIVE IMMUNITY ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL IN THE DAIRY HEIFER (IMMUNOGLOBULINS, MORBIDITY, NEONATE, MORTALITY, COLOSTRUM).
Author:
ROBISON, JON DAVID.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One thousand Holstein-Friesian heifer calves were studied to evaluate the effects of colostrum-derived 24 to 48 h serum Ig concentrations on growth and survival. The rate of growth increased as 24 to 48 h serum Ig concentrations increased. Calves born to first-calf heifers had higher 24 to 48 h serum Ig concentrations and gained weight at a higher rate of gain than heifers born to 3-year-old and older cows. The concentration of serum Ig at 24 to 48 h in the dairy heifer is a significant source of variation affecting average daily gain through the first 180 d of life. Seasonal factors were also significant in influencing rate of gain from birth to 6 months. Age of dam was a significant source of variation in calf weight gains, but only for the first 35 d of life. Approximately 28% of the calves absorbed less than 12 mg/ml of maternally-derived antibody. Heifers in this category suffered a death loss of 6.78% compared to only a 2.59% loss for heifers absorbing greater than 40 mg/ml Ig. Both season and age of dam were significant in affecting the concentration of 24 to 48 h serum Ig acquired. Forty-nine percent of the variation in 35 d serum Ig can be attributed to the variation found at 24 to 48 h. The data presented here indicate that proper management of factors influencing the absorption of colostral immunoglobulins by the neonatal dairy heifer would enhance the replacement rearing program.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Calves -- Diseases -- Prevention.; Dairy cattle -- Breeding.; Immunization.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Animal Physiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF PASSIVE IMMUNITY ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL IN THE DAIRY HEIFER (IMMUNOGLOBULINS, MORBIDITY, NEONATE, MORTALITY, COLOSTRUM).en_US
dc.creatorROBISON, JON DAVID.en_US
dc.contributor.authorROBISON, JON DAVID.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne thousand Holstein-Friesian heifer calves were studied to evaluate the effects of colostrum-derived 24 to 48 h serum Ig concentrations on growth and survival. The rate of growth increased as 24 to 48 h serum Ig concentrations increased. Calves born to first-calf heifers had higher 24 to 48 h serum Ig concentrations and gained weight at a higher rate of gain than heifers born to 3-year-old and older cows. The concentration of serum Ig at 24 to 48 h in the dairy heifer is a significant source of variation affecting average daily gain through the first 180 d of life. Seasonal factors were also significant in influencing rate of gain from birth to 6 months. Age of dam was a significant source of variation in calf weight gains, but only for the first 35 d of life. Approximately 28% of the calves absorbed less than 12 mg/ml of maternally-derived antibody. Heifers in this category suffered a death loss of 6.78% compared to only a 2.59% loss for heifers absorbing greater than 40 mg/ml Ig. Both season and age of dam were significant in affecting the concentration of 24 to 48 h serum Ig acquired. Forty-nine percent of the variation in 35 d serum Ig can be attributed to the variation found at 24 to 48 h. The data presented here indicate that proper management of factors influencing the absorption of colostral immunoglobulins by the neonatal dairy heifer would enhance the replacement rearing program.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCalves -- Diseases -- Prevention.en_US
dc.subjectDairy cattle -- Breeding.en_US
dc.subjectImmunization.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Physiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8504131en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693373449en_US
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