BIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF TETRANYCHUS CINNABARINUS AND TYPHLODROMUS OCCIDENTALIS (ACARINA: PHYTOSEIIDAE) AT THREE DIFFERENT TEMPERATURE REGIMES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187834
Title:
BIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF TETRANYCHUS CINNABARINUS AND TYPHLODROMUS OCCIDENTALIS (ACARINA: PHYTOSEIIDAE) AT THREE DIFFERENT TEMPERATURE REGIMES.
Author:
NORTHCRAFT, PHILIP DODDRIDGE.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Temperature effects on the biology of Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) and Typhlodromus occidentalis (Nesbitt) (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) were studied in the laboratory. Temperature had a definite effect on the developmental time, longevity and survival of adult females, and duration and rate of oviposition in both T. occidentalis and T. cinnabarinus. Increases in temperature significantly decrease developmental time, pre-oviposition periods, oviposition duration and rate, and the longevity and survival rates of both adult females. However, the daily consumption rate of T. occidentalis protonymph, deutonymph and adult gravid female increased significantly with an increase in temperature. Mean generation times decreased for both mites with an increase in temperature. The intrinsic rate of natural increase rose with each temperature increase. However, the r(m) of T. occidentalis was less than that for T. cinnabarinus at all temperature regimes, and it decreased from the 26.6° C regime to the 30.5° C regime. Of the three temperatures studied, 22.7°, 26.6°, and 3.5° C, 22.7° C proved to be the optimum for the predator to maintain control over the prey.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cotton -- Diseases and pests -- Arizona.; Agricultural pests -- Control -- Arizona.; Plant mites -- Biological control -- Arizona.; Carmine spider mite.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Entomology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Watson, Theo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF TETRANYCHUS CINNABARINUS AND TYPHLODROMUS OCCIDENTALIS (ACARINA: PHYTOSEIIDAE) AT THREE DIFFERENT TEMPERATURE REGIMES.en_US
dc.creatorNORTHCRAFT, PHILIP DODDRIDGE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNORTHCRAFT, PHILIP DODDRIDGE.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTemperature effects on the biology of Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) and Typhlodromus occidentalis (Nesbitt) (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) were studied in the laboratory. Temperature had a definite effect on the developmental time, longevity and survival of adult females, and duration and rate of oviposition in both T. occidentalis and T. cinnabarinus. Increases in temperature significantly decrease developmental time, pre-oviposition periods, oviposition duration and rate, and the longevity and survival rates of both adult females. However, the daily consumption rate of T. occidentalis protonymph, deutonymph and adult gravid female increased significantly with an increase in temperature. Mean generation times decreased for both mites with an increase in temperature. The intrinsic rate of natural increase rose with each temperature increase. However, the r(m) of T. occidentalis was less than that for T. cinnabarinus at all temperature regimes, and it decreased from the 26.6° C regime to the 30.5° C regime. Of the three temperatures studied, 22.7°, 26.6°, and 3.5° C, 22.7° C proved to be the optimum for the predator to maintain control over the prey.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Diseases and pests -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectAgricultural pests -- Control -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectPlant mites -- Biological control -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectCarmine spider mite.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWatson, Theoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8504126en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693373404en_US
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