Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187810
Title:
TOPICS IN PAPAGO MORPHOLOGY (SUFFIXES; ARIZONA).
Author:
ZEPEDA, OFELIA.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is an examination of Papago derivational morphology. Chapter One proposes a classification of lexical items based on the elements g and s in Papago. There is a category of lexical items which takes g, but not s (g-words), a category of lexical items which takes s, but not g (s-words), and a category of lexical items which take neither (0-element words). The classification, established on purely formal grounds, has clear semantic correlates. Further, given these three categories, the logical possibilities for derivational morphology are the following: g-word to g-word, g-word to s-word, g-word to 0-element word, 0-element word to 0-element word, 0-element word to g-word, 0-element word to s-word, and s-word to s-word, s-word to g-word, and s-word to 0-element word. Not all of these are instantiated; in particular, s-words are not subject to this simple derivational scheme. Chapters Two through Five present an analysis of a representative sample of derivational suffixes in Papago, exemplifying the first six logical possibilities. Chapter Six discusses the complications posed by s-words.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Tohono O'Odham dialect -- Morphology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Linguistics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTOPICS IN PAPAGO MORPHOLOGY (SUFFIXES; ARIZONA).en_US
dc.creatorZEPEDA, OFELIA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZEPEDA, OFELIA.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is an examination of Papago derivational morphology. Chapter One proposes a classification of lexical items based on the elements g and s in Papago. There is a category of lexical items which takes g, but not s (g-words), a category of lexical items which takes s, but not g (s-words), and a category of lexical items which take neither (0-element words). The classification, established on purely formal grounds, has clear semantic correlates. Further, given these three categories, the logical possibilities for derivational morphology are the following: g-word to g-word, g-word to s-word, g-word to 0-element word, 0-element word to 0-element word, 0-element word to g-word, 0-element word to s-word, and s-word to s-word, s-word to g-word, and s-word to 0-element word. Not all of these are instantiated; in particular, s-words are not subject to this simple derivational scheme. Chapters Two through Five present an analysis of a representative sample of derivational suffixes in Papago, exemplifying the first six logical possibilities. Chapter Six discusses the complications posed by s-words.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTohono O'Odham dialect -- Morphology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Janeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8500482en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693321684en_US
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