THE EFFECT OF CULTURE ON ALLOCATION OF MANPOWER AND EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AFRICAN NATIONS (UGANDA) (IMPROVEMENT, CYCLE, THEORY).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187794
Title:
THE EFFECT OF CULTURE ON ALLOCATION OF MANPOWER AND EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AFRICAN NATIONS (UGANDA) (IMPROVEMENT, CYCLE, THEORY).
Author:
KIWUWA, ABRAHAM EDWARD.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Every era confronts its distinctive social and political dramas. In the mid-twentieth century, center stage has frequently been dominated by the struggle of the so-called "Third World," first, for liberation from the colonial powers and then for development and entry into the modern world. The sixties were to be the "decade of development." Yet many of the emerging nations developed very little, if at all, and some slid backward. To this outcome, general political instability and specific tribal, religious, and ethnic conflicts made their contribution. The study analyzes the problem of whether traditional cultural values in African nations have hindered the needed steady progress which has occurred in the western counterpart in regards to political, social, and economic development. The methodological approach was done through a series of tests. The study was devised to demonstrate how a segment of a society can accelerate a need for a change to the advantage of the rest of the population. Questionnaires and interviews were developed and administered to 400 traditional Africans, predominantly Ugandans and 250 of a cross section of the American population. These were tested on members of the both societies with a career aspiration in leadership and administration. The study also looked at how people transmit their culture by reviewing and testing the written material about books on African and American culture. The study revealed that the traditional African people tested were in a transition from their historical static condition to the western culture of progress and that resistance to change was gradually on the verge of disappearing. The study also pointed out that there is a certain element in which the African nations aspiring to the goal of western development have tended to change within the context of African way of life development. The author reminds his readers that development is not abrupt process but demands careful attention to protect the future and that of the past and that the developing countries should not assimilate all the Western World offers them as an example.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Uganda -- Social conditions.; Developing countries -- Social conditions.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Butler, Henry E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF CULTURE ON ALLOCATION OF MANPOWER AND EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AFRICAN NATIONS (UGANDA) (IMPROVEMENT, CYCLE, THEORY).en_US
dc.creatorKIWUWA, ABRAHAM EDWARD.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKIWUWA, ABRAHAM EDWARD.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEvery era confronts its distinctive social and political dramas. In the mid-twentieth century, center stage has frequently been dominated by the struggle of the so-called "Third World," first, for liberation from the colonial powers and then for development and entry into the modern world. The sixties were to be the "decade of development." Yet many of the emerging nations developed very little, if at all, and some slid backward. To this outcome, general political instability and specific tribal, religious, and ethnic conflicts made their contribution. The study analyzes the problem of whether traditional cultural values in African nations have hindered the needed steady progress which has occurred in the western counterpart in regards to political, social, and economic development. The methodological approach was done through a series of tests. The study was devised to demonstrate how a segment of a society can accelerate a need for a change to the advantage of the rest of the population. Questionnaires and interviews were developed and administered to 400 traditional Africans, predominantly Ugandans and 250 of a cross section of the American population. These were tested on members of the both societies with a career aspiration in leadership and administration. The study also looked at how people transmit their culture by reviewing and testing the written material about books on African and American culture. The study revealed that the traditional African people tested were in a transition from their historical static condition to the western culture of progress and that resistance to change was gradually on the verge of disappearing. The study also pointed out that there is a certain element in which the African nations aspiring to the goal of western development have tended to change within the context of African way of life development. The author reminds his readers that development is not abrupt process but demands careful attention to protect the future and that of the past and that the developing countries should not assimilate all the Western World offers them as an example.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectUganda -- Social conditions.en_US
dc.subjectDeveloping countries -- Social conditions.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorButler, Henry E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrand, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchultz, Raymond E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFlores, Ernest Y.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNasser, Jack S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8500467en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693308167en_US
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