SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION AND UREA PHOSPHATE USE IN VEGETABLES ON CALCAREOUS SOILS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187779
Title:
SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION AND UREA PHOSPHATE USE IN VEGETABLES ON CALCAREOUS SOILS.
Author:
RUBEIZ, IBRAHIM GEORGE.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Drip irrigation lines placed 15 cm deep or 5 cm shallow below soil surface and furrow irrigation were compared on calcareous soils of southern Arizona. Crops grown were zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) 1982 and 1983 summers, and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.), 1982 fall. Furrows received a preplant application of phosphorus (P) at a rate of 100 kg P₂O₅/ha. Urea phosphate (UP) (17-44-0) solution was injected twice in drip lines during the growing season to give a total rate of 100 kg P₂O₅/ha on cabbage and 50 kg P₂O₅/ha on squash. Deep drip lines produced 52 and 34% higher yield than shallow drip in squash 1982 and 1983 experiments respectively. Deep drip yields were comparable to fertilized furrow yields with half the water and half the fertilizer rate of the furrow used by the deep drip. Unfertilized furrow yielded least. Application of UP in deep drip raised PO₄-P and NO₃-N concentration in squash leaves to comparable values in fertilized furrow plants. Shallow drip and unfertilized furrow plants had low nutrient concentrations. Soil analysis for NaHCO₃ extractable P and NO₃-N showed higher levels under drip than furrow treatments. Available P increased to 20 cm from emitters. EC was lower under drip than furrow. Soil pH was reduced by 0.5 units around emitters. Soil moisture in root zone was highest under furrows. Deep drip had more moisture than shallow drip. Injection of UP reduced water pH to 1.8 which prevented P precipitation. Cabbage yields were comparable under all fertilized treatments. Deep drip yielded 19% higher than shallow drip. Tissue analysis showed higher nutrient concentration under drip than furrow treatments. Soil analysis showed higher available P and NO₃-N and lower EC and pH under drip than furrow treatments. Mobility of PO₄ from UP was about 20 cm in soil columns. Rate of P fixation was high. Reduction in pH followed same pattern of P mobility. Root growth and distribution was more extensive under deep than shallow drip. Roots concentrated around deep UP zone in transparent cylinders.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Calcareous soils.; Microirrigation.; Urea as fertilizer.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION AND UREA PHOSPHATE USE IN VEGETABLES ON CALCAREOUS SOILS.en_US
dc.creatorRUBEIZ, IBRAHIM GEORGE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRUBEIZ, IBRAHIM GEORGE.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDrip irrigation lines placed 15 cm deep or 5 cm shallow below soil surface and furrow irrigation were compared on calcareous soils of southern Arizona. Crops grown were zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) 1982 and 1983 summers, and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.), 1982 fall. Furrows received a preplant application of phosphorus (P) at a rate of 100 kg P₂O₅/ha. Urea phosphate (UP) (17-44-0) solution was injected twice in drip lines during the growing season to give a total rate of 100 kg P₂O₅/ha on cabbage and 50 kg P₂O₅/ha on squash. Deep drip lines produced 52 and 34% higher yield than shallow drip in squash 1982 and 1983 experiments respectively. Deep drip yields were comparable to fertilized furrow yields with half the water and half the fertilizer rate of the furrow used by the deep drip. Unfertilized furrow yielded least. Application of UP in deep drip raised PO₄-P and NO₃-N concentration in squash leaves to comparable values in fertilized furrow plants. Shallow drip and unfertilized furrow plants had low nutrient concentrations. Soil analysis for NaHCO₃ extractable P and NO₃-N showed higher levels under drip than furrow treatments. Available P increased to 20 cm from emitters. EC was lower under drip than furrow. Soil pH was reduced by 0.5 units around emitters. Soil moisture in root zone was highest under furrows. Deep drip had more moisture than shallow drip. Injection of UP reduced water pH to 1.8 which prevented P precipitation. Cabbage yields were comparable under all fertilized treatments. Deep drip yielded 19% higher than shallow drip. Tissue analysis showed higher nutrient concentration under drip than furrow treatments. Soil analysis showed higher available P and NO₃-N and lower EC and pH under drip than furrow treatments. Mobility of PO₄ from UP was about 20 cm in soil columns. Rate of P fixation was high. Reduction in pH followed same pattern of P mobility. Root growth and distribution was more extensive under deep than shallow drip. Roots concentrated around deep UP zone in transparent cylinders.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCalcareous soils.en_US
dc.subjectMicroirrigation.en_US
dc.subjectUrea as fertilizer.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8424933en_US
dc.identifier.oclc693291456en_US
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