THE EFFECTS OF EEG BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING ON THE BEHAVIOR OF HYPERACTIVE CHILDREN.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187770
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF EEG BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING ON THE BEHAVIOR OF HYPERACTIVE CHILDREN.
Author:
PARZIALE, JEFFREY LYNN.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Satterfield (1974) and other, i.e. Lubar and Shouse (1978) have suggested a relationship between arousal level and hyperactivity such that low cortical arousal was related to lowered inhibitory control on the part of the hyperactive child. The present study was designed to test this theory using EEG activity as a measure of arousal and certain psychological tests and rating scales as dependent measures. Also, to investigate the utility of this procedure in a small clinic setting. The sample consisted of 16 hyperactive males between the ages of 6-12. These children were placed into either the placebo or experimental group. A controlled group outcome design was utilized in this study. Data consisted of four biofeedback measures and four test measures. Following a pre-test battery and baseline session, children received seven weeks of training. Finally, a post-test battery and baseline session concluded the study. The results were summarized and placed on graphs and table. Biofeedback data displaced measurable change in the predicted direction, as did rating scale data. Three other test measures displayed positive, but non-significant changes. Implications for the study were noted. Recommendations for practitioners and future research centered on the concepts of generalization, parental involvement and practice.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF EEG BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING ON THE BEHAVIOR OF HYPERACTIVE CHILDREN.en_US
dc.creatorPARZIALE, JEFFREY LYNN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPARZIALE, JEFFREY LYNN.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSatterfield (1974) and other, i.e. Lubar and Shouse (1978) have suggested a relationship between arousal level and hyperactivity such that low cortical arousal was related to lowered inhibitory control on the part of the hyperactive child. The present study was designed to test this theory using EEG activity as a measure of arousal and certain psychological tests and rating scales as dependent measures. Also, to investigate the utility of this procedure in a small clinic setting. The sample consisted of 16 hyperactive males between the ages of 6-12. These children were placed into either the placebo or experimental group. A controlled group outcome design was utilized in this study. Data consisted of four biofeedback measures and four test measures. Following a pre-test battery and baseline session, children received seven weeks of training. Finally, a post-test battery and baseline session concluded the study. The results were summarized and placed on graphs and table. Biofeedback data displaced measurable change in the predicted direction, as did rating scale data. Three other test measures displayed positive, but non-significant changes. Implications for the study were noted. Recommendations for practitioners and future research centered on the concepts of generalization, parental involvement and practice.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217451en_US
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