THE BEHAVIORS ACCOMPANYING THE WRITING PROCESS IN SELECTED THIRD AND FOURTH GRADE NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187749
Title:
THE BEHAVIORS ACCOMPANYING THE WRITING PROCESS IN SELECTED THIRD AND FOURTH GRADE NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN.
Author:
KASTEN, WENDY CHRISTINA.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study is designed to analyze in depth, the behaviors that accompany the writing process in six third and fourth grade Native American children. The children's writing, collected over a two year period, was observed by a team of researchers who carefully recorded revisions, rereading, subvocalization, resource use, stop-and-thinks, interruptions, and related talk while writing was taking place in the regular classroom setting. Four groups of questions were posed as a result of the observations focusing around the kinds of resources young writers use, the way they revised, the role of oral language during composing, and the relationship among the various observed behaviors. Young writers use both human resources and a wide variety of inanimate resources such as dictionaries, bulletin boards, and other classroom print to assist themselves and each other in spelling words, and making various other decisions about their writing. The subjects have differing strategies for revising their texts, but have spelling and neatness as their highest priorities. Children use more resources more extensively when they are encouraged to, when the materials are accessible, and collaboration among classmates is promoted. Approximately 90% of all oral language that takes place as children write is related directly to their writing. Oral language is a part of and seems to be important to all phases of writing, including strategies for consideration of what to write, collaboration with others and finding an audience. The use of oral language demonstrates that all aspects of the composing process including pre-writing, text generation, and revision or reconsideration of text are dynamically interacting as writers compose. There are important co-occurrence of types of behaviors including stop-and-thinks with interruptions, revisions with subvocalization, and revisions with resource use.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
English language -- Composition and exercises -- Study and teaching (Elementary); English language -- Rhetoric.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Elementary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE BEHAVIORS ACCOMPANYING THE WRITING PROCESS IN SELECTED THIRD AND FOURTH GRADE NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN.en_US
dc.creatorKASTEN, WENDY CHRISTINA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKASTEN, WENDY CHRISTINA.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study is designed to analyze in depth, the behaviors that accompany the writing process in six third and fourth grade Native American children. The children's writing, collected over a two year period, was observed by a team of researchers who carefully recorded revisions, rereading, subvocalization, resource use, stop-and-thinks, interruptions, and related talk while writing was taking place in the regular classroom setting. Four groups of questions were posed as a result of the observations focusing around the kinds of resources young writers use, the way they revised, the role of oral language during composing, and the relationship among the various observed behaviors. Young writers use both human resources and a wide variety of inanimate resources such as dictionaries, bulletin boards, and other classroom print to assist themselves and each other in spelling words, and making various other decisions about their writing. The subjects have differing strategies for revising their texts, but have spelling and neatness as their highest priorities. Children use more resources more extensively when they are encouraged to, when the materials are accessible, and collaboration among classmates is promoted. Approximately 90% of all oral language that takes place as children write is related directly to their writing. Oral language is a part of and seems to be important to all phases of writing, including strategies for consideration of what to write, collaboration with others and finding an audience. The use of oral language demonstrates that all aspects of the composing process including pre-writing, text generation, and revision or reconsideration of text are dynamically interacting as writers compose. There are important co-occurrence of types of behaviors including stop-and-thinks with interruptions, revisions with subvocalization, and revisions with resource use.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Composition and exercises -- Study and teaching (Elementary)en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Rhetoric.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElementary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoggs, Juanitaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8424905en_US
dc.identifier.oclc691323224en_US
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