SPATIAL, SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF PHYMATOTRICHUM OMNIVORUM (SHEAR) DUGGAR IN ARIZONA COTTON (GEOGRAPHY, REMOTE SENSING, PLANT PATHOLOGY).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187733
Title:
SPATIAL, SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF PHYMATOTRICHUM OMNIVORUM (SHEAR) DUGGAR IN ARIZONA COTTON (GEOGRAPHY, REMOTE SENSING, PLANT PATHOLOGY).
Author:
PARTON, MICHAEL C.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Phymatotrichum root rot is a fungal disease with a host range that includes many economically important crops in the southwestern United States and Mexico. While it has been studied since the late nineteenth century, ecological relationships of the disease, particularly those related to its distribution and dispersal, are not understood. Combined ground radiance sampling and aerial photographic interpretation was employed to study the distribution of Phymatotrichum root rot in cotton. Radiometric ground sampling showed that diseased cotton has a characteristic spectral signature that is significantly different from healthy cotton at visible wavelengths. Micro-scale examination of distribution within fields utilized multitemporal photography, both within season (1983) and for four seasons (1979-1982), revealed that the disease spreads during a season, but is not recurrent in many cases between years. Meso-scale mapping employed multitemporal photography to map distribution during a four-year period. When compared to mapped soil units, these data revealed a significantly non-random relationship between the diseased areas of fields and fine-textured soil units that may be based on moisture-holding potential. A yield analysis was also preformed using Thematic Mapper Simulator data and computer analysis.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cotton root rot -- Remote sensing.; Cotton -- Diseases and pests -- Arizona.; Aerial photography in agriculture -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography and Regional Development; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSPATIAL, SPECTRAL AND TEMPORAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF PHYMATOTRICHUM OMNIVORUM (SHEAR) DUGGAR IN ARIZONA COTTON (GEOGRAPHY, REMOTE SENSING, PLANT PATHOLOGY).en_US
dc.creatorPARTON, MICHAEL C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPARTON, MICHAEL C.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhymatotrichum root rot is a fungal disease with a host range that includes many economically important crops in the southwestern United States and Mexico. While it has been studied since the late nineteenth century, ecological relationships of the disease, particularly those related to its distribution and dispersal, are not understood. Combined ground radiance sampling and aerial photographic interpretation was employed to study the distribution of Phymatotrichum root rot in cotton. Radiometric ground sampling showed that diseased cotton has a characteristic spectral signature that is significantly different from healthy cotton at visible wavelengths. Micro-scale examination of distribution within fields utilized multitemporal photography, both within season (1983) and for four seasons (1979-1982), revealed that the disease spreads during a season, but is not recurrent in many cases between years. Meso-scale mapping employed multitemporal photography to map distribution during a four-year period. When compared to mapped soil units, these data revealed a significantly non-random relationship between the diseased areas of fields and fine-textured soil units that may be based on moisture-holding potential. A yield analysis was also preformed using Thematic Mapper Simulator data and computer analysis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCotton root rot -- Remote sensing.en_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Diseases and pests -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectAerial photography in agriculture -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8421980en_US
dc.identifier.oclc691340142en_US
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