FRENCH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: TEACHER CERTIFICATION IN CANADA (IMMERSION, FSL, CORE FRENCH).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187719
Title:
FRENCH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: TEACHER CERTIFICATION IN CANADA (IMMERSION, FSL, CORE FRENCH).
Author:
CAMPEAU, PAULETTE CECILE.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explores the policies and requirements governing French immersion teacher certification at the secondary level as prescribed by the Ministry of Education and the universities in each of Canada's ten provinces. Four components are examined: (1) certification procedures, (2) professional training, (3) course credit and competency requirements, and (4) provisions for certified teachers. An analysis of responses to a mailed questionnaire revealed that: (1) Quebec and Ontario are the only two provinces that have specific requirements for FSL certification, (2) there is little agreement among respondents regarding existing reciprocity agreements, (3) there is little consistency in the FSL components of teacher-training programs across Canada, (4) the approved program approach is the most common procedure used for certification, (5) all proposed changes address the need to separate French Immersion training programs from the generic FSL education, (6) none of the provinces currently offer a bonafide Bilingual Education training program, (7) no additional teacher-training is presently required to certify an Anglophone for FSL teaching, and (8) the responsibility of defining the criteria for the selection of FSL teachers is at times assumed by a school board, a denominational education committee, a university, a Ministry of Education, or by supply and demand. Three recommendations were made to the Council of Ministers of Canada: (1) that national assessment centers be established to determine competencies of FSL teacher candidates; (2) that three specific bases of information be established: (a) a national pool of competency-based and criterion referenced performance items, (b) a clearinghouse to assist in evaluating assessment procedures, (c) four regional information exchanges; (3) that research be conducted to determine the feasibility and effective methods of utilizing French native speakers in FSL teaching.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual -- Law and legislation -- Canada.; Bilingualism -- Canada.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFRENCH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: TEACHER CERTIFICATION IN CANADA (IMMERSION, FSL, CORE FRENCH).en_US
dc.creatorCAMPEAU, PAULETTE CECILE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCAMPEAU, PAULETTE CECILE.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the policies and requirements governing French immersion teacher certification at the secondary level as prescribed by the Ministry of Education and the universities in each of Canada's ten provinces. Four components are examined: (1) certification procedures, (2) professional training, (3) course credit and competency requirements, and (4) provisions for certified teachers. An analysis of responses to a mailed questionnaire revealed that: (1) Quebec and Ontario are the only two provinces that have specific requirements for FSL certification, (2) there is little agreement among respondents regarding existing reciprocity agreements, (3) there is little consistency in the FSL components of teacher-training programs across Canada, (4) the approved program approach is the most common procedure used for certification, (5) all proposed changes address the need to separate French Immersion training programs from the generic FSL education, (6) none of the provinces currently offer a bonafide Bilingual Education training program, (7) no additional teacher-training is presently required to certify an Anglophone for FSL teaching, and (8) the responsibility of defining the criteria for the selection of FSL teachers is at times assumed by a school board, a denominational education committee, a university, a Ministry of Education, or by supply and demand. Three recommendations were made to the Council of Ministers of Canada: (1) that national assessment centers be established to determine competencies of FSL teacher candidates; (2) that three specific bases of information be established: (a) a national pool of competency-based and criterion referenced performance items, (b) a clearinghouse to assist in evaluating assessment procedures, (c) four regional information exchanges; (3) that research be conducted to determine the feasibility and effective methods of utilizing French native speakers in FSL teaching.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual -- Law and legislation -- Canada.en_US
dc.subjectBilingualism -- Canada.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8421967en_US
dc.identifier.oclc691285076en_US
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