THE EFFECT OF CLIENTS' CHOICE OF THERAPIST AND PRE-THERAPY TRAINING ON OUTCOME IN PSYCHOTHERAPY.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187712
Title:
THE EFFECT OF CLIENTS' CHOICE OF THERAPIST AND PRE-THERAPY TRAINING ON OUTCOME IN PSYCHOTHERAPY.
Author:
MOODY, ANDREA JILL.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation explored the effects of two independent variables choosing a therapist and pretherapy training (PTT) and their interaction on psychotherapeutic outcome. The subjects were students who applied for counseling services at the University of Arizona's Student Counseling Serivice. Six therapists participated in the study by seeing the subjects who were assigned to them by the investigator for three sessions each. Subjects were assigned to one of six groups: (1) first choice therapy and viewing of pretherapy training videotape, (2) other than first choice therapist and viewing of pretherapy training videotape, (3) no choice therapist (random assignment) and viewing of pretherapy training videotape, (4) first choice therapist and not viewing the pretherapy training videotape, (5) other than first choice therapist and not viewing the pretherapy training videotape and, (6) no choice of therapist (random assignment) and not viewing the pretherapy training videotape. All therapists in the study were videotaped conducting a ten minute intake interview with the same model client. Subjects that were in groups requiring choosing a therapist, groups one, two, four, and five, viewed videotapes of three therapists and made their selection from that subgroup. The pretherapy training videotape was a model counseling session between a model therapist and model client followed by a commentary of the ways in which the client behaved appropriately during the counseling session. The two instruments used were a self-report instrument for the clients, the Brief Symptom Psychiatric Rating Scale (Overall and Aronson, 1962). Pretest measures were taken using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) prior to treatment and using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) after the first session. Post-test measures using both instruments were taken after the 3rd therapy session. ANCOVAs were performed, using the pre-test score as the covariate. No significant effects were found for the choice variable on either the BSI or the BPRS. Significant effects were found for pre-therapy training on the Depressive Mood and Hostility scales of the BPRS although no effect was found for pretherapy training on the BSI. The only significant interaction effect for the two independent variables was found on the Hostility subscale of the BSI.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychotherapist and patient.; Psychotherapists.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bence, Marlene

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF CLIENTS' CHOICE OF THERAPIST AND PRE-THERAPY TRAINING ON OUTCOME IN PSYCHOTHERAPY.en_US
dc.creatorMOODY, ANDREA JILL.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMOODY, ANDREA JILL.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation explored the effects of two independent variables choosing a therapist and pretherapy training (PTT) and their interaction on psychotherapeutic outcome. The subjects were students who applied for counseling services at the University of Arizona's Student Counseling Serivice. Six therapists participated in the study by seeing the subjects who were assigned to them by the investigator for three sessions each. Subjects were assigned to one of six groups: (1) first choice therapy and viewing of pretherapy training videotape, (2) other than first choice therapist and viewing of pretherapy training videotape, (3) no choice therapist (random assignment) and viewing of pretherapy training videotape, (4) first choice therapist and not viewing the pretherapy training videotape, (5) other than first choice therapist and not viewing the pretherapy training videotape and, (6) no choice of therapist (random assignment) and not viewing the pretherapy training videotape. All therapists in the study were videotaped conducting a ten minute intake interview with the same model client. Subjects that were in groups requiring choosing a therapist, groups one, two, four, and five, viewed videotapes of three therapists and made their selection from that subgroup. The pretherapy training videotape was a model counseling session between a model therapist and model client followed by a commentary of the ways in which the client behaved appropriately during the counseling session. The two instruments used were a self-report instrument for the clients, the Brief Symptom Psychiatric Rating Scale (Overall and Aronson, 1962). Pretest measures were taken using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) prior to treatment and using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) after the first session. Post-test measures using both instruments were taken after the 3rd therapy session. ANCOVAs were performed, using the pre-test score as the covariate. No significant effects were found for the choice variable on either the BSI or the BPRS. Significant effects were found for pre-therapy training on the Depressive Mood and Hostility scales of the BPRS although no effect was found for pretherapy training on the BSI. The only significant interaction effect for the two independent variables was found on the Hostility subscale of the BSI.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychotherapist and patient.en_US
dc.subjectPsychotherapists.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBence, Marleneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrganist, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThweatt, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWren, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest8421582en_US
dc.identifier.oclc691307781en_US
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