ESTROGEN BINDING SITES IN HUMAN NEOPLASIA; DETECTION USING A MORPHOLOGIC TECHNIQUE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187704
Title:
ESTROGEN BINDING SITES IN HUMAN NEOPLASIA; DETECTION USING A MORPHOLOGIC TECHNIQUE.
Author:
PENNY, ROBERT JAMES.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Thirty six cases of human endometrium (9 normals, 9 adenomatous hyperplasias and 18 cancers) were established as finite monolayer tissue cultures. All were evaluated for the presence of estrogen binding sites (EBS) by an indirect immunofluorescent (IF) technique. Positive EBS were identified in 33% of normals, 67% of hyperplasias and 62% of cancers. Serial subpassage EBS evaluation was performed in fourteen cases. In was observed that the stability of EBS positivity in vitro was related to type of endometrium rather than culture longevity (2 of 2 normals, 2 of 4 hyperplasias and 1 of 8 cancers remained positive throughout the period of study). Twelve of the cancers were studied for estrogen receptor by cytosol assay and 11 (91.6%) correlated with the IF marker method. Thirty-eight cases of breast cancer were studied for EBS by a direct cytochemical and immunofluorescent technique. Evaluation by the direct method proved to be consistent and easy in performance. Morphologic positivity was 60% with the indirect method and 94.7% with the direct method. Correlation with the chemical cytosol was 77% with the indirect method and 86.8% with the direct method. These results confirm and compare favorably with other reported studies of morphologic methods. It was suggested that attention should be directed to cellular localization of receptors as a possible means for predicting endocrine responsiveness of neoplasms. Cancers from tissues presumed to be target-variants for estrogen stimulation were investigated with the direct cytochemical technique to determine if EBS were present. Forty-eight randomly selected tumors from multiple organ systems were assessed for EBS. Appropriate control tests were used to determine specificity. A total of 23 of the 48 cases were interpreted as positive for EBS. These sites were localized to cytoplasmic, nuclear and nucleolar cellular compartments. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in patients with breast carcinoma are of value in the selection of patients for hormonal adjuvant therapy. Whether this will prove to be true for EBS in a variety of neoplasms is currently unknown and is worthy of investigation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Binding sites (Biochemistry); Estrogen -- Receptors.; Tumors -- Treatment.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Genetics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleESTROGEN BINDING SITES IN HUMAN NEOPLASIA; DETECTION USING A MORPHOLOGIC TECHNIQUE.en_US
dc.creatorPENNY, ROBERT JAMES.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPENNY, ROBERT JAMES.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThirty six cases of human endometrium (9 normals, 9 adenomatous hyperplasias and 18 cancers) were established as finite monolayer tissue cultures. All were evaluated for the presence of estrogen binding sites (EBS) by an indirect immunofluorescent (IF) technique. Positive EBS were identified in 33% of normals, 67% of hyperplasias and 62% of cancers. Serial subpassage EBS evaluation was performed in fourteen cases. In was observed that the stability of EBS positivity in vitro was related to type of endometrium rather than culture longevity (2 of 2 normals, 2 of 4 hyperplasias and 1 of 8 cancers remained positive throughout the period of study). Twelve of the cancers were studied for estrogen receptor by cytosol assay and 11 (91.6%) correlated with the IF marker method. Thirty-eight cases of breast cancer were studied for EBS by a direct cytochemical and immunofluorescent technique. Evaluation by the direct method proved to be consistent and easy in performance. Morphologic positivity was 60% with the indirect method and 94.7% with the direct method. Correlation with the chemical cytosol was 77% with the indirect method and 86.8% with the direct method. These results confirm and compare favorably with other reported studies of morphologic methods. It was suggested that attention should be directed to cellular localization of receptors as a possible means for predicting endocrine responsiveness of neoplasms. Cancers from tissues presumed to be target-variants for estrogen stimulation were investigated with the direct cytochemical technique to determine if EBS were present. Forty-eight randomly selected tumors from multiple organ systems were assessed for EBS. Appropriate control tests were used to determine specificity. A total of 23 of the 48 cases were interpreted as positive for EBS. These sites were localized to cytoplasmic, nuclear and nucleolar cellular compartments. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in patients with breast carcinoma are of value in the selection of patients for hormonal adjuvant therapy. Whether this will prove to be true for EBS in a variety of neoplasms is currently unknown and is worthy of investigation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBinding sites (Biochemistry)en_US
dc.subjectEstrogen -- Receptors.en_US
dc.subjectTumors -- Treatment.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeneticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8415076en_US
dc.identifier.oclc691273135en_US
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