EASING THE TRANSITION FROM ELEMENTARY TO MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION (SELF ESTEEM, SELF CONCEPT, ADOLESCENT).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187652
Title:
EASING THE TRANSITION FROM ELEMENTARY TO MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION (SELF ESTEEM, SELF CONCEPT, ADOLESCENT).
Author:
JONES, RANDALL M.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A total of 367 fifth and sixth graders were identified in the spring 1982, from district projection lists specific to one 6-8 middle school. This sample represented five separate schools; one K-5, three K-6 schools, and one 6-8 school. Subjects were administered a questionnaire two weeks prior to the end of the 1982 school year, three days into the 1983 school year, and three more times during the first quarter of the new school year. The questionnaire was composed of nine self-image measures that had been utilized with early adolescents in either self-image research or investigations focusing upon school transition. Transition effects (as evidenced by time 1 and time 2 comparisons) were observed on the measures of self-consciousness, victimization, and anonymity only. Perceptions of anonymity and victimization were significantly greater at the start of a new school year (time 2) than they had been prior to transition (time 1). Self-consciousness scores showed a significant decrease from pre- to post-transition. Timing of transition comparisons revealed significant effects for the self-consciousness, victimization, and anonymity measures. Both feeder school conditions expressed significantly greater perceptions of self-consciousness and victimization than students making the transition within the same school. For duration of transitional effects (all five measurement occasions), nonsignificant effects were observed on all nine self-image constructs. Collectively, the immediate impact of transition upon early adolescent self-consciousness, and perceptions of victimization and anonymity, was not measurable nine weeks into the new school year. The detriments to self-image attributable to school transition were transitory at best. Likewise, timing of transition (i.e., 5th or 6th grade) was a moot point nine weeks into the new school year.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEASING THE TRANSITION FROM ELEMENTARY TO MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION (SELF ESTEEM, SELF CONCEPT, ADOLESCENT).en_US
dc.creatorJONES, RANDALL M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJONES, RANDALL M.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA total of 367 fifth and sixth graders were identified in the spring 1982, from district projection lists specific to one 6-8 middle school. This sample represented five separate schools; one K-5, three K-6 schools, and one 6-8 school. Subjects were administered a questionnaire two weeks prior to the end of the 1982 school year, three days into the 1983 school year, and three more times during the first quarter of the new school year. The questionnaire was composed of nine self-image measures that had been utilized with early adolescents in either self-image research or investigations focusing upon school transition. Transition effects (as evidenced by time 1 and time 2 comparisons) were observed on the measures of self-consciousness, victimization, and anonymity only. Perceptions of anonymity and victimization were significantly greater at the start of a new school year (time 2) than they had been prior to transition (time 1). Self-consciousness scores showed a significant decrease from pre- to post-transition. Timing of transition comparisons revealed significant effects for the self-consciousness, victimization, and anonymity measures. Both feeder school conditions expressed significantly greater perceptions of self-consciousness and victimization than students making the transition within the same school. For duration of transitional effects (all five measurement occasions), nonsignificant effects were observed on all nine self-image constructs. Collectively, the immediate impact of transition upon early adolescent self-consciousness, and perceptions of victimization and anonymity, was not measurable nine weeks into the new school year. The detriments to self-image attributable to school transition were transitory at best. Likewise, timing of transition (i.e., 5th or 6th grade) was a moot point nine weeks into the new school year.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8412669en_US
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