THE PALEOECOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN FRONTIER OF MESOAMERICA (POLLEN, MEXICO, ARCHAEOLOGY).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187640
Title:
THE PALEOECOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN FRONTIER OF MESOAMERICA (POLLEN, MEXICO, ARCHAEOLOGY).
Author:
BROWN, ROY BERNARD.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
While the archaeology of the Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica is poorly understood, Pedro Armillas' hypothesis that climatically induced environmental change was the limiting factor for cultural change has become the ruling theory. In order to test this hypothesis original lacustrine pollen profiles were compared with a detailed inspection of the known archaeological record and the previously published paleoecological record. The archaeological evidence suggests that there was a dense human occupation in the northern reaches of Mesoamerica between about AD 600-900. The first indications of human settlements are related to the Chupicuaro culture that reached its apogee about 2000 years ago located along the Rio Lerma. A rustic variant of the Chupicuaro culture spread north and is associated with scattered hamlets. About AD 600 the sedentary population expanded considerably in conjunction with the development of regional centers and the Coyotlatelco red-on-buff ceramic tradition. This expansion can be seen all along the Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica from Alta Vista south to Tula. Between AD 900-1000 there was a dramatic change in settlement patterns and by about AD 1000 most of the northern reaches of Mesoamerica were once again under the control of semi-nomadic hunters and gatherers. A suite of four cores was collected in a transect that crosses the Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica. The goal of selecting sites that minimized human impact was not altogether successful since these cores identify the impact of agriculture. Within the limits of the dating and material available, the pollen profiles from these cores suggest an environmental change between AD 1000 and 1500. From the data available it is not clear if this change, or changes, was the result of changes in human settlement patterns or climatic change. As such Armillas' hypothesis remains unproven.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Paleoecology -- Mexico.; Indians of Mexico -- Antiquities.; Mexico -- Antiquities.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE PALEOECOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN FRONTIER OF MESOAMERICA (POLLEN, MEXICO, ARCHAEOLOGY).en_US
dc.creatorBROWN, ROY BERNARD.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBROWN, ROY BERNARD.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile the archaeology of the Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica is poorly understood, Pedro Armillas' hypothesis that climatically induced environmental change was the limiting factor for cultural change has become the ruling theory. In order to test this hypothesis original lacustrine pollen profiles were compared with a detailed inspection of the known archaeological record and the previously published paleoecological record. The archaeological evidence suggests that there was a dense human occupation in the northern reaches of Mesoamerica between about AD 600-900. The first indications of human settlements are related to the Chupicuaro culture that reached its apogee about 2000 years ago located along the Rio Lerma. A rustic variant of the Chupicuaro culture spread north and is associated with scattered hamlets. About AD 600 the sedentary population expanded considerably in conjunction with the development of regional centers and the Coyotlatelco red-on-buff ceramic tradition. This expansion can be seen all along the Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica from Alta Vista south to Tula. Between AD 900-1000 there was a dramatic change in settlement patterns and by about AD 1000 most of the northern reaches of Mesoamerica were once again under the control of semi-nomadic hunters and gatherers. A suite of four cores was collected in a transect that crosses the Northern Frontier of Mesoamerica. The goal of selecting sites that minimized human impact was not altogether successful since these cores identify the impact of agriculture. Within the limits of the dating and material available, the pollen profiles from these cores suggest an environmental change between AD 1000 and 1500. From the data available it is not clear if this change, or changes, was the result of changes in human settlement patterns or climatic change. As such Armillas' hypothesis remains unproven.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPaleoecology -- Mexico.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of Mexico -- Antiquities.en_US
dc.subjectMexico -- Antiquities.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCulbert, T. Patricken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Owen K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDean, Jefferyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaury, Emilen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarkgraf, Veraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8412658en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690680474en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.