Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187629
Title:
THE EFFECT OF METACOGNITIVE STRATEGIES ON CHILDREN'S WRITING.
Author:
VAUGHAN, SHERRY CURTIS.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explored the effects of metacognitive strategies on expository writing performance and metacognitive awareness of sixth graders. Metacognitive knowledge refers to students' ability to talk and write about the variables operating in expository tasks, the availability and appropriateness of strategies for producing expository text and how aspects of writing interact with the appropriateness of strategies available to the writer. High and low ability students were assigned to an experimental group who received instruction in metacognitive awareness strategies or to a control group. Three different types of measures included writing performance measures of syntax, mechanics and semantics/pragmatics; metacognitive awareness measures; and individual differences measures. The syntax and mechanics measures and the individual differences measures were standardized by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Results indicated no significant differences in either writing performance or metacognitive awareness for the two groups. Possible causal factors emerged: Expository writing performance was shown to be situation specific; a group design did not allow for a clear description of what factors contributed to the uneven performances; writers may not have performed well since a functional context and a source of motivation were lacking. Writing assessment and research design became the central issues of this study. Any comparison of two pieces of writing cannot reflect a writer's competence. Contextual factors influence the writer's performance on any task and a research design needs to allow for description of those factors.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cognition in children.; Children -- Writing.; Exposition (Rhetoric)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF METACOGNITIVE STRATEGIES ON CHILDREN'S WRITING.en_US
dc.creatorVAUGHAN, SHERRY CURTIS.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVAUGHAN, SHERRY CURTIS.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the effects of metacognitive strategies on expository writing performance and metacognitive awareness of sixth graders. Metacognitive knowledge refers to students' ability to talk and write about the variables operating in expository tasks, the availability and appropriateness of strategies for producing expository text and how aspects of writing interact with the appropriateness of strategies available to the writer. High and low ability students were assigned to an experimental group who received instruction in metacognitive awareness strategies or to a control group. Three different types of measures included writing performance measures of syntax, mechanics and semantics/pragmatics; metacognitive awareness measures; and individual differences measures. The syntax and mechanics measures and the individual differences measures were standardized by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Results indicated no significant differences in either writing performance or metacognitive awareness for the two groups. Possible causal factors emerged: Expository writing performance was shown to be situation specific; a group design did not allow for a clear description of what factors contributed to the uneven performances; writers may not have performed well since a functional context and a source of motivation were lacking. Writing assessment and research design became the central issues of this study. Any comparison of two pieces of writing cannot reflect a writer's competence. Contextual factors influence the writer's performance on any task and a research design needs to allow for description of those factors.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCognition in children.en_US
dc.subjectChildren -- Writing.en_US
dc.subjectExposition (Rhetoric)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKnief, Lotusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBerliner, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8405511en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690662451en_US
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