Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187612
Title:
THE CERAMICS OF COZUMEL, QUINTANA ROO, MEXICO.
Author:
CONNOR, JUDITH G.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study presents the results of an analysis of the archaeological ceramics recovered from Maya sites on the island of Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The field work was conducted in 1972-1973 by the Harvard University-University of Arizona Cozumel Archaeological Project which had as it focus the investigation of several aspects of long distance trade in Postclassic Maya society. The objectives of the study were (1) to analyze, classify, and describe the Cozumel ceramic remains, (2) to further clarify the island's prehistory through interpretation of ceramic data and relationships, and (3) to evaluate the Cozumel Archaeological Project's port of trade model from the standpoint of the ceramic evidence. Chapter 1 provides background information on the setting, history, and archaeology of Cozumel and adjacent coastal areas and summarizes the Cozumel Archaeological Project's research design and field investigations. This is followed in Chapter 2 by a discussion of the techniques of ceramic analysis employed in the study, including a brief summary of the type-variety system of ceramic classification. Chapters 3 through 10 present detailed descriptions of the ceramic complexes, arranged chronologically. Each variety of each ceramic type is described, including paste characteristics, surface finish, decoration, form, and comparative data. The Cozumel ceramic record indicates settlement on the island from Late Preclassic (ca. 300 B.C.-A.D. 300) through Late Postclassic (ca. A.D. 1250-1500/1550) times. An overview of the prehistory of Cozumel is presented in Chapter eleven. Chapter twelve presents the results of an attribute analysis of slipped serving dishes and unslipped jars which was undertaken to test the port of trade model. The model hypothesizes that Cozumel underwent a shift from a decentralized port of trade in the Early Postclassic, characterized by heterogeneity in archaeological remains, to a centralized trading center in the Late Postclassic, characterized by homogeneity. While the attribute analysis demonstrated an increase in intersite similarity and ceramic homogeneity in the Late Postclassic, results for the Early Postclassic were inconclusive. Chapter fourteen briefly summarizes the study's results and conclusions. Although the port of trade model was not verified by the ceramic evidence, there is considerable evidence that Cozumel may have been the site of a Toltec trade outpost in Early Postclassic times.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cozumel (Mexico) -- Antiquities.; Quintana Roo (Mexico : State) -- Antiquities.; Indian pottery -- Mexico.; Mayas -- Antiquities.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE CERAMICS OF COZUMEL, QUINTANA ROO, MEXICO.en_US
dc.creatorCONNOR, JUDITH G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCONNOR, JUDITH G.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study presents the results of an analysis of the archaeological ceramics recovered from Maya sites on the island of Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The field work was conducted in 1972-1973 by the Harvard University-University of Arizona Cozumel Archaeological Project which had as it focus the investigation of several aspects of long distance trade in Postclassic Maya society. The objectives of the study were (1) to analyze, classify, and describe the Cozumel ceramic remains, (2) to further clarify the island's prehistory through interpretation of ceramic data and relationships, and (3) to evaluate the Cozumel Archaeological Project's port of trade model from the standpoint of the ceramic evidence. Chapter 1 provides background information on the setting, history, and archaeology of Cozumel and adjacent coastal areas and summarizes the Cozumel Archaeological Project's research design and field investigations. This is followed in Chapter 2 by a discussion of the techniques of ceramic analysis employed in the study, including a brief summary of the type-variety system of ceramic classification. Chapters 3 through 10 present detailed descriptions of the ceramic complexes, arranged chronologically. Each variety of each ceramic type is described, including paste characteristics, surface finish, decoration, form, and comparative data. The Cozumel ceramic record indicates settlement on the island from Late Preclassic (ca. 300 B.C.-A.D. 300) through Late Postclassic (ca. A.D. 1250-1500/1550) times. An overview of the prehistory of Cozumel is presented in Chapter eleven. Chapter twelve presents the results of an attribute analysis of slipped serving dishes and unslipped jars which was undertaken to test the port of trade model. The model hypothesizes that Cozumel underwent a shift from a decentralized port of trade in the Early Postclassic, characterized by heterogeneity in archaeological remains, to a centralized trading center in the Late Postclassic, characterized by homogeneity. While the attribute analysis demonstrated an increase in intersite similarity and ceramic homogeneity in the Late Postclassic, results for the Early Postclassic were inconclusive. Chapter fourteen briefly summarizes the study's results and conclusions. Although the port of trade model was not verified by the ceramic evidence, there is considerable evidence that Cozumel may have been the site of a Toltec trade outpost in Early Postclassic times.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCozumel (Mexico) -- Antiquities.en_US
dc.subjectQuintana Roo (Mexico : State) -- Antiquities.en_US
dc.subjectIndian pottery -- Mexico.en_US
dc.subjectMayas -- Antiquities.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8405492en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690652299en_US
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