Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187610
Title:
GENERAL WILLIAM SELBY HARNEY: FRONTIER SOLDIER, 1800-1889.
Author:
ADAMS, GEORGE ROLLIE.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
William Selby Harney, born in Tennessee in 1800, entered the United States Army as a lieutenant at age seventeen. Like many officers, he learned on the job, and in some ways he resembled the stereotypical, hell-raising, blood-and-guts, Indian-fighter of modern-day novelists and movie makers. He was quarrelsome, quick-tempered, and sometimes vicious, and his frequent bickering typified the entire officer corps. After years of routine duty, in 1829 Harney participated in the Atkinson Expedition against Arikara Indians on the upper Missouri River. Promoted to captain, he performed garrision duty in the Old Northwest and in 1832 fought in the Black Hawk War. In 1833 Harney married Mary Mullanphy of St. Louis and secured a paymaster's appointment and major's rank. He failed at this job, though, and in 1834 murdered a slave. He avoided punishment and in 1836 was appointed lieutenant colonel in the Second Dragoons. Subsequently Harney earned widespread recognition for effective Indian campaigns. During the Second Seminole War he developed new amphibious riverine tactics. During the Mexican War his attack on Cerro Gordo prepared the way for American capture of Mexico City. Afterward in Texas, he advocated using more mounted troops against plains Indians. In 1855-56 he decisively defeated the Sioux in Nebraska and set precedents for future army operations. In the 1850s Harney helped maintain civil order in "Bleeding" Kansas and in Utah, where Mormons resisted federal authority. He was subsequently promoted to brigadier general, but the remainder of his career proved frustrating. While commanding the Department of Oregon in 1859, he almost thrust America into war with Great Britain by occupying jointly claimed San Juan Island. In 1861, while commanding the Department of the West, he failed to take firm action to assure Union control of Missouri, and that called into question his loyalty to the Union. President Lincoln removed him from command. Harney's career illustrates both the army's successes and its failures in facilitating westward expansion and suggests that the military performed as well as it could with its limited resources. Harney died in 1889.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Harney, William Selby, 1800-1889.; United States. Army -- Biography.; Generals -- United States -- Biography.; Indians of North America -- Wars -- 1815-1875.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichols, Roger L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGENERAL WILLIAM SELBY HARNEY: FRONTIER SOLDIER, 1800-1889.en_US
dc.creatorADAMS, GEORGE ROLLIE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorADAMS, GEORGE ROLLIE.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWilliam Selby Harney, born in Tennessee in 1800, entered the United States Army as a lieutenant at age seventeen. Like many officers, he learned on the job, and in some ways he resembled the stereotypical, hell-raising, blood-and-guts, Indian-fighter of modern-day novelists and movie makers. He was quarrelsome, quick-tempered, and sometimes vicious, and his frequent bickering typified the entire officer corps. After years of routine duty, in 1829 Harney participated in the Atkinson Expedition against Arikara Indians on the upper Missouri River. Promoted to captain, he performed garrision duty in the Old Northwest and in 1832 fought in the Black Hawk War. In 1833 Harney married Mary Mullanphy of St. Louis and secured a paymaster's appointment and major's rank. He failed at this job, though, and in 1834 murdered a slave. He avoided punishment and in 1836 was appointed lieutenant colonel in the Second Dragoons. Subsequently Harney earned widespread recognition for effective Indian campaigns. During the Second Seminole War he developed new amphibious riverine tactics. During the Mexican War his attack on Cerro Gordo prepared the way for American capture of Mexico City. Afterward in Texas, he advocated using more mounted troops against plains Indians. In 1855-56 he decisively defeated the Sioux in Nebraska and set precedents for future army operations. In the 1850s Harney helped maintain civil order in "Bleeding" Kansas and in Utah, where Mormons resisted federal authority. He was subsequently promoted to brigadier general, but the remainder of his career proved frustrating. While commanding the Department of Oregon in 1859, he almost thrust America into war with Great Britain by occupying jointly claimed San Juan Island. In 1861, while commanding the Department of the West, he failed to take firm action to assure Union control of Missouri, and that called into question his loyalty to the Union. President Lincoln removed him from command. Harney's career illustrates both the army's successes and its failures in facilitating westward expansion and suggests that the military performed as well as it could with its limited resources. Harney died in 1889.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHarney, William Selby, 1800-1889.en_US
dc.subjectUnited States. Army -- Biography.en_US
dc.subjectGenerals -- United States -- Biography.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Wars -- 1815-1875.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichols, Roger L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8405490en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690648872en_US
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