DYNASTS AND REVOLUTIONISTS: A SYNTHESIS OF TOLTEC CHRONOLOGY AND HISTORY (ETHNOHISTORY, MESOAMERICA, MEXICO).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187602
Title:
DYNASTS AND REVOLUTIONISTS: A SYNTHESIS OF TOLTEC CHRONOLOGY AND HISTORY (ETHNOHISTORY, MESOAMERICA, MEXICO).
Author:
MOLLOY, JOHN PATRICK.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The accompanying dissertation presents a synthesis of Toltec history based on new materials including in situ inscription, Mixtec historical codices, and central highland redacted texts that have not heretofore been applied to Toltec studies. In addition, the traditional sources have been reexamined in light of these new materials. After considering research methods and methodology this dissertation examines personal and place-name naming systems given by the Mixtec codices and in situ inscriptions. In addition, a study of the semiotics of Meso-american authority and power is carried out. The Mixtec central highland and Maya chronologies are examined and a trial Toltec chronology is presented. The Toltec dynastic sequence is discussed in terms of its most likely placement in the trial chronology. This presentation serves to introduce the reader to the various ruler lists and their interpretation. The bulk of the dissertation presents a period by period expository history of the Toltecs. First the dissertation undertakes the study of Mixtec and Toltec origins and emphasizes the War of Heaven and the pro-Tula history of the central highlands. Next, Toltec expansion during the reigns of 8 Deer Jaguar Claw and 4 Jaguar is examined. After this the reigns and history of Mixcoatl and Quetzalcoatl are discussed. This discussion emphasizes the role of Chichen Itza and southern Meso-america in Toltec history. Then the dissertation examines the reigns of the last Toltec kings, the Toltec collapse and the rise of post-Toltec-Chichimec dynasts. Finally a processual model emphasizing hierarchy theory is applied to the problem of collapsing civilizations. In writing this dissertation I have made use of most probable best fit scenarios. Such models are often created through employing repeated retroductive testing of multiple hypotheses, but in the long run inductive processes predominate. Hence this thesis is directed toward historical critical rather than processual analysis. In a hopefully best sense this dissertation, although based on historical critical paradigms, is intended as a humanistic as well as a scientific endeavor.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Toltecs -- History.; Indians of Mexico -- History.; Chichimecs -- History.; Mexico -- Antiquities.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDYNASTS AND REVOLUTIONISTS: A SYNTHESIS OF TOLTEC CHRONOLOGY AND HISTORY (ETHNOHISTORY, MESOAMERICA, MEXICO).en_US
dc.creatorMOLLOY, JOHN PATRICK.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMOLLOY, JOHN PATRICK.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe accompanying dissertation presents a synthesis of Toltec history based on new materials including in situ inscription, Mixtec historical codices, and central highland redacted texts that have not heretofore been applied to Toltec studies. In addition, the traditional sources have been reexamined in light of these new materials. After considering research methods and methodology this dissertation examines personal and place-name naming systems given by the Mixtec codices and in situ inscriptions. In addition, a study of the semiotics of Meso-american authority and power is carried out. The Mixtec central highland and Maya chronologies are examined and a trial Toltec chronology is presented. The Toltec dynastic sequence is discussed in terms of its most likely placement in the trial chronology. This presentation serves to introduce the reader to the various ruler lists and their interpretation. The bulk of the dissertation presents a period by period expository history of the Toltecs. First the dissertation undertakes the study of Mixtec and Toltec origins and emphasizes the War of Heaven and the pro-Tula history of the central highlands. Next, Toltec expansion during the reigns of 8 Deer Jaguar Claw and 4 Jaguar is examined. After this the reigns and history of Mixcoatl and Quetzalcoatl are discussed. This discussion emphasizes the role of Chichen Itza and southern Meso-america in Toltec history. Then the dissertation examines the reigns of the last Toltec kings, the Toltec collapse and the rise of post-Toltec-Chichimec dynasts. Finally a processual model emphasizing hierarchy theory is applied to the problem of collapsing civilizations. In writing this dissertation I have made use of most probable best fit scenarios. Such models are often created through employing repeated retroductive testing of multiple hypotheses, but in the long run inductive processes predominate. Hence this thesis is directed toward historical critical rather than processual analysis. In a hopefully best sense this dissertation, although based on historical critical paradigms, is intended as a humanistic as well as a scientific endeavor.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectToltecs -- History.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of Mexico -- History.en_US
dc.subjectChichimecs -- History.en_US
dc.subjectMexico -- Antiquities.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8404672en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690247579en_US
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