Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187588
Title:
VIRUS INTERACTIONS IN MIXED INFECTIONS (CAPSICUM ANUUM).
Author:
ALEGBEJO, MATTHEW DADA.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Reciprocal interference experiments between Potato virus Y (PVY) and Pepper mottle virus (PeMV) in Capsicum annuum L. 'Tabasco' and 'Special pepper' (a selection of Anaheim chilli peppers), showed suppression of local lesion production in both directions but incomplete suppression of challenge virus replication (incomplete cross protection). However, suppression was reduced by increasing the concentration of the challenge virus. The source of inoculum of the viruses did not have a significant effect on the subsequent interference between the viruses. A direct relationship was established between counts of local lesions and virus particles counted using the electron microscope. Tobacco etch virus (TEV) was transmitted from one Capsicum annuum L. 'Tabasco' plant to another in the same pot within 4 days after infection of the test plant. Transmission probably took place via root grafts, as the necrotic roots of the test plants intertwined with the uninoculated Tabasco plants. Mixed infections of PVY and PeMV resulted in the production of PVY-N, a new strain of PVY. The new strain, which could be recognized by changes in biological and serological properties, was produced only in mixed infections and was stable after six serial transfers in several hosts. Evidence suggests that the development of the new strain is host dependent. Potato Virus Y in mixed infections with PeMV or TEV in C. annuum L. 'Anaheim' did not induce local lesions, systemic necrosis nor death of Special pepper, while PeMV alone induced the death of Tabasco. The behavior of TEV in Tabasco in a mixed infection was temperature dependent, while TEV alone induced wilt and death of Tabasco irrespective of the greenhouse temperature and season of the year.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Plant viruses.; Potato virus Y.; Viruses -- Reproduction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Pathology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nelson, Merritt

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleVIRUS INTERACTIONS IN MIXED INFECTIONS (CAPSICUM ANUUM).en_US
dc.creatorALEGBEJO, MATTHEW DADA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorALEGBEJO, MATTHEW DADA.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractReciprocal interference experiments between Potato virus Y (PVY) and Pepper mottle virus (PeMV) in Capsicum annuum L. 'Tabasco' and 'Special pepper' (a selection of Anaheim chilli peppers), showed suppression of local lesion production in both directions but incomplete suppression of challenge virus replication (incomplete cross protection). However, suppression was reduced by increasing the concentration of the challenge virus. The source of inoculum of the viruses did not have a significant effect on the subsequent interference between the viruses. A direct relationship was established between counts of local lesions and virus particles counted using the electron microscope. Tobacco etch virus (TEV) was transmitted from one Capsicum annuum L. 'Tabasco' plant to another in the same pot within 4 days after infection of the test plant. Transmission probably took place via root grafts, as the necrotic roots of the test plants intertwined with the uninoculated Tabasco plants. Mixed infections of PVY and PeMV resulted in the production of PVY-N, a new strain of PVY. The new strain, which could be recognized by changes in biological and serological properties, was produced only in mixed infections and was stable after six serial transfers in several hosts. Evidence suggests that the development of the new strain is host dependent. Potato Virus Y in mixed infections with PeMV or TEV in C. annuum L. 'Anaheim' did not induce local lesions, systemic necrosis nor death of Special pepper, while PeMV alone induced the death of Tabasco. The behavior of TEV in Tabasco in a mixed infection was temperature dependent, while TEV alone induced wilt and death of Tabasco irrespective of the greenhouse temperature and season of the year.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPlant viruses.en_US
dc.subjectPotato virus Y.en_US
dc.subjectViruses -- Reproduction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Pathologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNelson, Merritten_US
dc.identifier.proquest8404659en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690278810en_US
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