PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS RELATED TO THE ONSET OF CHILDHOOD CANCER (STRESS, FAMILY, GREECE).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187580
Title:
PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS RELATED TO THE ONSET OF CHILDHOOD CANCER (STRESS, FAMILY, GREECE).
Author:
PAPADATOU, DANAI.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate some psychosocial factors that may be related to the development of childhood cancer. The questions that guided the study were: When compared to families of healthy children (1) Do the family structure, dynamics and atmosphere present any commonalities among children with cancer? (2) Are there any personality characteristics common to children with cancer? (3) Have children with cancer experienced more of stressful events during the year that preceded diagnosis? (4) Have children with cancer experienced a major loss? Twelve children between the ages of 2 to 13 who were diagnosed with a form of cancer were compared to twelve healthy but accidently injured children of the same age, and sex and socioeconomic background hospitalized at the 2nd Pediatric Department of The University of Athens. A semistructured interview was used to gather information from their mothers within the month that followed the child's diagnosis or accident. Chi-square and T-test analyses were used at the .05 level of significance to determine differences between groups on each of the variables. Findings revealed that, compared to healthy children, children with cancer tended to belong to "broken home" families in which most had experienced (a) the loss or absence of a significant person (particularly the father) early in their life or (b) an unhappy marriage between their parents, frequently resulting from an "arranged" marriage. Within their family children occupied a special status and were raised as "only" or "first-borns." A major upcoming event was anticipated in most of their families within the same month that the diagnosis was pronounced; this event was aborted as a result of the child's diagnosis. Limitations of the study, discussion of the methodology and recommendations for further research are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Tumors in children -- Psychological aspects.; Sick children -- Psychology.; Cancer -- Patients -- Psychological aspects.; Child psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christensen, Oscar

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS RELATED TO THE ONSET OF CHILDHOOD CANCER (STRESS, FAMILY, GREECE).en_US
dc.creatorPAPADATOU, DANAI.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPAPADATOU, DANAI.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate some psychosocial factors that may be related to the development of childhood cancer. The questions that guided the study were: When compared to families of healthy children (1) Do the family structure, dynamics and atmosphere present any commonalities among children with cancer? (2) Are there any personality characteristics common to children with cancer? (3) Have children with cancer experienced more of stressful events during the year that preceded diagnosis? (4) Have children with cancer experienced a major loss? Twelve children between the ages of 2 to 13 who were diagnosed with a form of cancer were compared to twelve healthy but accidently injured children of the same age, and sex and socioeconomic background hospitalized at the 2nd Pediatric Department of The University of Athens. A semistructured interview was used to gather information from their mothers within the month that followed the child's diagnosis or accident. Chi-square and T-test analyses were used at the .05 level of significance to determine differences between groups on each of the variables. Findings revealed that, compared to healthy children, children with cancer tended to belong to "broken home" families in which most had experienced (a) the loss or absence of a significant person (particularly the father) early in their life or (b) an unhappy marriage between their parents, frequently resulting from an "arranged" marriage. Within their family children occupied a special status and were raised as "only" or "first-borns." A major upcoming event was anticipated in most of their families within the same month that the diagnosis was pronounced; this event was aborted as a result of the child's diagnosis. Limitations of the study, discussion of the methodology and recommendations for further research are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTumors in children -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectSick children -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectCancer -- Patients -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectChild psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristensen, Oscaren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8403239en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690275726en_US
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