Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187577
Title:
NUTRIENT UPTAKE BY GRASSES GROWN ON SOME RANGE SOILS IN ARIZONA.
Author:
MOHAMED ELTOM, OSMAN ABDELRAHMAN.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, manganese, copper and selenium in grasses grown under rainfed conditions on different soils in the Santa Rita Experimental Range and other areas in southern Arizona were evaluated to determine whether these nutrients are deficient, sufficient or toxic to cattle. In the greenhouse, two grasses grown on five different soils representing four soil orders were fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus and the uptake of a number of nutrients was determined. For the grasses collected from the field, the nutrient contents generally decreased with time to maturity and the highest levels were attained during August when the grasses were young, and March, the start of the spring growth. The nitrogen and phosphorus contents were lower than the requirement for grazing cattle indicating the need for supplementing protein and phosphorus. The contents of potassium, calcium, zinc, manganese, copper and selenium were adequate for grazing animals. Although the magnesium level in some cases was lower than the requirement, it was considered adequate because its deficiency is now known in warm season grasses. The nutrient contents in the grasses grown on Comoro soils were generally higher than when grown on an adjacent Sonoita soil. Soil analysis revealed no consistent pattern of the levels in these grasses and in Comoro and Sonita soils on which they were grown, except for nitrogen. The nutrient contents in the heads and leaves of two species of grasses were higher than in their stems. The greenhouse experiments showed that the vegetation on the N + P treatment was more vigorous than on the nitrogen treatment and the control, respectively. For the two grasses grown on the five different soils, the nitrogen and magnesium contents mostly were not significantly different between the three treatments, probably due to the dilution effect resulting from the vigorous vegetative growth on the N + P treatment. The phosphorus content in the grasses grown on the N + P treatment was significantly higher than the other two treatments. The nitrogen and phosphorus levels in the soils before and after planting were similar indicating that nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization helped maintain their levels in the soils. Other nutrients in the soils decreased after planting. Most of the nutrients were higher in the surface soils than in the subsurface soils, probably due to the ability of grasses to recycle nutrients from the subsoil.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Grasses -- Arizona -- Composition.; Grasses as feed.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soils, Water and Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stroehlein, Jack L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNUTRIENT UPTAKE BY GRASSES GROWN ON SOME RANGE SOILS IN ARIZONA.en_US
dc.creatorMOHAMED ELTOM, OSMAN ABDELRAHMAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMOHAMED ELTOM, OSMAN ABDELRAHMAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLevels of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, manganese, copper and selenium in grasses grown under rainfed conditions on different soils in the Santa Rita Experimental Range and other areas in southern Arizona were evaluated to determine whether these nutrients are deficient, sufficient or toxic to cattle. In the greenhouse, two grasses grown on five different soils representing four soil orders were fertilized with nitrogen and phosphorus and the uptake of a number of nutrients was determined. For the grasses collected from the field, the nutrient contents generally decreased with time to maturity and the highest levels were attained during August when the grasses were young, and March, the start of the spring growth. The nitrogen and phosphorus contents were lower than the requirement for grazing cattle indicating the need for supplementing protein and phosphorus. The contents of potassium, calcium, zinc, manganese, copper and selenium were adequate for grazing animals. Although the magnesium level in some cases was lower than the requirement, it was considered adequate because its deficiency is now known in warm season grasses. The nutrient contents in the grasses grown on Comoro soils were generally higher than when grown on an adjacent Sonoita soil. Soil analysis revealed no consistent pattern of the levels in these grasses and in Comoro and Sonita soils on which they were grown, except for nitrogen. The nutrient contents in the heads and leaves of two species of grasses were higher than in their stems. The greenhouse experiments showed that the vegetation on the N + P treatment was more vigorous than on the nitrogen treatment and the control, respectively. For the two grasses grown on the five different soils, the nitrogen and magnesium contents mostly were not significantly different between the three treatments, probably due to the dilution effect resulting from the vigorous vegetative growth on the N + P treatment. The phosphorus content in the grasses grown on the N + P treatment was significantly higher than the other two treatments. The nitrogen and phosphorus levels in the soils before and after planting were similar indicating that nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization helped maintain their levels in the soils. Other nutrients in the soils decreased after planting. Most of the nutrients were higher in the surface soils than in the subsurface soils, probably due to the ability of grasses to recycle nutrients from the subsoil.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGrasses -- Arizona -- Composition.en_US
dc.subjectGrasses as feed.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoils, Water and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStroehlein, Jack L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHendricks, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStith, Lee S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCox, Milo L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8403236en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690272585en_US
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