Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187555
Title:
Settlement and society in Early Bronze I and n Canaan
Author:
Joffe, Alexander H.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation discusses the development of the Early Bronze I and II periods in the southern Levant or Canaan and changes in indigenous patterns of social complexity. Settlement pattern and other data are used. Chapter One outlines aspects of methodology, beginning with an assessment of archaeological surveys and their limitations. Issues of survey design, execution and publication, formation processes, and the analysts of survey materials, all make settlement patterns problematic. They do not represent an adequate or accurate sample upon which to base socio-economic or political inferences. Chapter Two reviews the history of archaeological work and thought on the Early Bronze I period from the 1930s untll the present. Chapter Three reviews the theoretical and archaeological background to the emergence of complex societies In the fourth and third millennia BC. The southern Levant was 'preadapted' to cycles of rising and collapsing complexity by organizational and ultimately ideological mechanisms of social decomposition and reformulation, necessitated by the diversity of the southern Levantine geo-environment, small physical scale, and fluctuations in climate. The Early Bronze Age is the beginning of an episode which alternated between periods of urban and village life. The Chalcolithic period is reviewed. Chapter Four discusses social organization and change In the village-level EB I period. Control over metals and other resources and highland settlement are noted. The relationship of Canaan with its neighbors is discussed, and particularly Egyptian colonlalism. EB I is the starting point for a pattern of development and collapse around the fundamental building block of small kin or lineage units. Chapter Five discusses the EB II period and the structure and operation of Canaanite 'urban' systems. Economic power over immediate hinterlands and rural hIghland producers was exerted by lowland sItes controlling the distribution and exchange of agrIcultural goods, prlmarily the Mediterranean crops of olives and grapes, and their ceramic containers. Among the results were both dependent and independent rural settlement. Chapter Six presents several generalizations on archaeological approaches to complex societies, and dIscusses cyclical aspects of changes in social complexity In Canaan during latar periods. Site lists and maps are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dever, William G.
Committee Chair:
Yoffee, Norman

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSettlement and society in Early Bronze I and n Canaanen_US
dc.creatorJoffe, Alexander H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJoffe, Alexander H.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation discusses the development of the Early Bronze I and II periods in the southern Levant or Canaan and changes in indigenous patterns of social complexity. Settlement pattern and other data are used. Chapter One outlines aspects of methodology, beginning with an assessment of archaeological surveys and their limitations. Issues of survey design, execution and publication, formation processes, and the analysts of survey materials, all make settlement patterns problematic. They do not represent an adequate or accurate sample upon which to base socio-economic or political inferences. Chapter Two reviews the history of archaeological work and thought on the Early Bronze I period from the 1930s untll the present. Chapter Three reviews the theoretical and archaeological background to the emergence of complex societies In the fourth and third millennia BC. The southern Levant was 'preadapted' to cycles of rising and collapsing complexity by organizational and ultimately ideological mechanisms of social decomposition and reformulation, necessitated by the diversity of the southern Levantine geo-environment, small physical scale, and fluctuations in climate. The Early Bronze Age is the beginning of an episode which alternated between periods of urban and village life. The Chalcolithic period is reviewed. Chapter Four discusses social organization and change In the village-level EB I period. Control over metals and other resources and highland settlement are noted. The relationship of Canaan with its neighbors is discussed, and particularly Egyptian colonlalism. EB I is the starting point for a pattern of development and collapse around the fundamental building block of small kin or lineage units. Chapter Five discusses the EB II period and the structure and operation of Canaanite 'urban' systems. Economic power over immediate hinterlands and rural hIghland producers was exerted by lowland sItes controlling the distribution and exchange of agrIcultural goods, prlmarily the Mediterranean crops of olives and grapes, and their ceramic containers. Among the results were both dependent and independent rural settlement. Chapter Six presents several generalizations on archaeological approaches to complex societies, and dIscusses cyclical aspects of changes in social complexity In Canaan during latar periods. Site lists and maps are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDever, William G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairYoffee, Normanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBonine, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKramer, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYoffee, Normanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9125460en_US
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