A methodological perspective on the use and organization of space: A case study of Hohokam structures from Snaketown, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187552
Title:
A methodological perspective on the use and organization of space: A case study of Hohokam structures from Snaketown, Arizona
Author:
Seymour, Deni Joanne
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of intramural space is examined in and between structures from the Hohokam site of Snaketown, Arizona. The approach advocated in this volume results from a disenchantment with the efficacy of pre-established functional categories for characterizing structure use and accounting for the variability present. In an effort to transcend the vague concept of house function categories of use-areas are defined which represent widespread regularities in the way intramural space is used and arranged. The latter are identified on the basis of spatial patterns of use that are visible cross-culturally in ethnographies and ethnoarchaeological reports and through the examination of artifact and feature arrangments in the archaeological sample from Snaketown. House types, defined on the basis of differing combinations of use-areas, are examined in the context of spatial aggregates of houses, courtyard groups. Their distributions serve as a basis for deriving inferences regarding the nature, localization, and size of cooperating economic groups at the site. Replication of use-area categories and house types within and between courtyard groups, indicates that cooperating economic groups existed at various levels at Snaketown, both above and below the level of the courtyard group.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geosciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schiffer, Michael B.
Committee Chair:
Schiffer, Michael B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA methodological perspective on the use and organization of space: A case study of Hohokam structures from Snaketown, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorSeymour, Deni Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeymour, Deni Joanneen_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of intramural space is examined in and between structures from the Hohokam site of Snaketown, Arizona. The approach advocated in this volume results from a disenchantment with the efficacy of pre-established functional categories for characterizing structure use and accounting for the variability present. In an effort to transcend the vague concept of house function categories of use-areas are defined which represent widespread regularities in the way intramural space is used and arranged. The latter are identified on the basis of spatial patterns of use that are visible cross-culturally in ethnographies and ethnoarchaeological reports and through the examination of artifact and feature arrangments in the archaeological sample from Snaketown. House types, defined on the basis of differing combinations of use-areas, are examined in the context of spatial aggregates of houses, courtyard groups. Their distributions serve as a basis for deriving inferences regarding the nature, localization, and size of cooperating economic groups at the site. Replication of use-area categories and house types within and between courtyard groups, indicates that cooperating economic groups existed at various levels at Snaketown, both above and below the level of the courtyard group.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.contributor.chairSchiffer, Michael B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaury, Emil W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9111966en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.