MODELING FOR OPTIMAL PRODUCTION DECISIONS AND PERFORMANCE CONTROL IN AQUACULTURE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187537
Title:
MODELING FOR OPTIMAL PRODUCTION DECISIONS AND PERFORMANCE CONTROL IN AQUACULTURE.
Author:
WILSON, BEVERLEY MOCHEL.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One result of the search for inexpensive alternative sources of protein has been the rise in interest in aquaculture, the rearing of aquatic organisms under controlled conditions. In this dissertation we examine several management approaches to the efficient rearing of aquatic animals, using mathematical modeling to discover optimal production decisions. In addition we demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous decision and performance control, providing empirical support for a theoretical extension of traditional variance analysis techniques. The results of three studies are included. In the first we model a situation in which the manager of an aquaculture system must decide when and how many animals to stock initially, how many animals to harvest each period, and when to restock an enclosure in order to maximize contribution. We consider both limited and unlimited growing seasons, solving mixed-integer and linear programs. We examine the effects of technological improvements on production strategies. Consistent improvement in contribution is noted, along with some variation in strategy. In the second study we introduce seasonal variation in revenues and lengthen the growing season. The resulting large-scale real-world mixed-integer problem necessitates the use of a heuristic and two strategies, selective expansion and sieve, in order to achieve a near-optimal solution within a reasonable length of time. In the third study we focus on the uncertainty inherent in the aquaculture environment. We provide empirical evidence of the feasibility of a performance evaluation system which gives explicit consideration to the effects of environmental uncertainty and incorporates intraperiod adaptive behavior on behalf of the individual responsible for implementation of model-specified activities. The system we describe may be used in the simultaneous evaluation of individual and model performances, thus clarifying responsibilities for variances and improving production control.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Aquaculture industry -- Mathematical models.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Accounting; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMODELING FOR OPTIMAL PRODUCTION DECISIONS AND PERFORMANCE CONTROL IN AQUACULTURE.en_US
dc.creatorWILSON, BEVERLEY MOCHEL.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWILSON, BEVERLEY MOCHEL.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne result of the search for inexpensive alternative sources of protein has been the rise in interest in aquaculture, the rearing of aquatic organisms under controlled conditions. In this dissertation we examine several management approaches to the efficient rearing of aquatic animals, using mathematical modeling to discover optimal production decisions. In addition we demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous decision and performance control, providing empirical support for a theoretical extension of traditional variance analysis techniques. The results of three studies are included. In the first we model a situation in which the manager of an aquaculture system must decide when and how many animals to stock initially, how many animals to harvest each period, and when to restock an enclosure in order to maximize contribution. We consider both limited and unlimited growing seasons, solving mixed-integer and linear programs. We examine the effects of technological improvements on production strategies. Consistent improvement in contribution is noted, along with some variation in strategy. In the second study we introduce seasonal variation in revenues and lengthen the growing season. The resulting large-scale real-world mixed-integer problem necessitates the use of a heuristic and two strategies, selective expansion and sieve, in order to achieve a near-optimal solution within a reasonable length of time. In the third study we focus on the uncertainty inherent in the aquaculture environment. We provide empirical evidence of the feasibility of a performance evaluation system which gives explicit consideration to the effects of environmental uncertainty and incorporates intraperiod adaptive behavior on behalf of the individual responsible for implementation of model-specified activities. The system we describe may be used in the simultaneous evaluation of individual and model performances, thus clarifying responsibilities for variances and improving production control.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAquaculture industry -- Mathematical models.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAccountingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShaftel, Timothy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarefield, Russell M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarrett, William B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8401278en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690161730en_US
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