American Indian Navajo adolescent parenting: Multiple perspectives within context.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187520
Title:
American Indian Navajo adolescent parenting: Multiple perspectives within context.
Author:
Dalla, Rochelle Lene'.
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this descriptive investigation, Navajo Native American teenage parenting was examined. Two goals were addressed. To begin, despite high rates of teenage parenting on the Navajo Reservation, in comparison with the country in general, no literature exists examining this topic. In response, the first goal was to examine Navajo teenage parenting from a broad, inclusive perspective. Bronfenbrenner's (1989) Ecological System's Theory comprised the theoretical foundation for accomplishing this task. Second, this investigation was conceptualized in reaction to the extant teenage parenting literature which paints an oversimplified picture of youthful parenting, and which largely characterizes adolescent mothers as "deviant." In this investigation, teenage parenting was examined through the lives of those women experiencing it, divorced from the typically applied "medical model" framework. Principles of Postmodern Feminism provided an alternative perspective from which to view teenage parenting. To capture the essence of the ecology of teenage parenting on the Navajo Reservation, three groups of participants were included: Navajo adolescent mothers provided an individual/personalized perspective, their own mothers provided an historical/cross-generational perspective, and community members provided a global/community wide perspective. Each participant was interviewed at length; data were recorded, transcribed and then analyzed using Phenomenological Descriptive Analysis (Colaizzi, 1978). Data analysis resulted in the teenage mothers being classified according to their expressed degree of identification with two roles, namely, those of mother and adolescent. Results suggested that role identification may be a powerful construct, or developmentally structuring attribute (Bronfenbrenner, 1989), from which to examine individual orientations and reactions toward teenage parenthood. Grandmothers were classified according to the amount of support each provided her teenage daughter and grandchild(ren) and was significantly affected by the youths' role identification. Community members concurred that teenage parenting was not condoned, but that teenage mothers were supported by their families or extended kin. Results from this investigation (a) affirm the heterogeneity both within and among teenage parenting populations, and their families, and (b) may be utilized to enhance existing models of adolescent parenting which overlook key individual differences.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family and Consumer Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gamble, Wendy C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAmerican Indian Navajo adolescent parenting: Multiple perspectives within context.en_US
dc.creatorDalla, Rochelle Lene'.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDalla, Rochelle Lene'.en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this descriptive investigation, Navajo Native American teenage parenting was examined. Two goals were addressed. To begin, despite high rates of teenage parenting on the Navajo Reservation, in comparison with the country in general, no literature exists examining this topic. In response, the first goal was to examine Navajo teenage parenting from a broad, inclusive perspective. Bronfenbrenner's (1989) Ecological System's Theory comprised the theoretical foundation for accomplishing this task. Second, this investigation was conceptualized in reaction to the extant teenage parenting literature which paints an oversimplified picture of youthful parenting, and which largely characterizes adolescent mothers as "deviant." In this investigation, teenage parenting was examined through the lives of those women experiencing it, divorced from the typically applied "medical model" framework. Principles of Postmodern Feminism provided an alternative perspective from which to view teenage parenting. To capture the essence of the ecology of teenage parenting on the Navajo Reservation, three groups of participants were included: Navajo adolescent mothers provided an individual/personalized perspective, their own mothers provided an historical/cross-generational perspective, and community members provided a global/community wide perspective. Each participant was interviewed at length; data were recorded, transcribed and then analyzed using Phenomenological Descriptive Analysis (Colaizzi, 1978). Data analysis resulted in the teenage mothers being classified according to their expressed degree of identification with two roles, namely, those of mother and adolescent. Results suggested that role identification may be a powerful construct, or developmentally structuring attribute (Bronfenbrenner, 1989), from which to examine individual orientations and reactions toward teenage parenthood. Grandmothers were classified according to the amount of support each provided her teenage daughter and grandchild(ren) and was significantly affected by the youths' role identification. Community members concurred that teenage parenting was not condoned, but that teenage mothers were supported by their families or extended kin. Results from this investigation (a) affirm the heterogeneity both within and among teenage parenting populations, and their families, and (b) may be utilized to enhance existing models of adolescent parenting which overlook key individual differences.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGamble, Wendy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetts, Sherry C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStauss, Jayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhillips, Linda R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9626564en_US
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