Adaptation and communicative design: Patterns of interaction in deceptive and truthful interchanges.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187518
Title:
Adaptation and communicative design: Patterns of interaction in deceptive and truthful interchanges.
Author:
White, Cindy Hagemeier.
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two theoretical frameworks which examine the nature of adaptability and mutual influence in interaction, Interpersonal Deception Theory and Interaction Adaptation Theory, were used to derive hypothesis concerning the patterns of adjustment and accommodation in communication style that occur across time in face-to-face deceptive and truthful interactions. Specifically, these theories provided predictions concerning the influence of deception on communicators' needs, expections and desires, initial behavior in face-to-face interaction, the patterns of interaction that emerge between senders and receivers such as reciprocity and compensation, and the impact of behavior on evaluation of communicative effectiveness. Two experimental studies were conducted in which senders were either truthful or deceptive in their interactions with a partner. The first study, which included 48 same-sex dyads, provided information about the influence of needs, expectations, and desires on initial behavior and about the influence of interaction on these same factors. The second study, which included 48 same-sex dyads, involved a longer interaction in which receivers altered their behavior by increasing of decreasing conversational involvement, in order to examine the patterns of interaction that emerged across time. Results revealed that deceivers felt more anxious and were more concerned about self-presentation than truthtellers prior to the interaction. These differences were reflected in initial behavior, with deceivers displaying less conversational involvement than truthtellers. Patterns of interaction were also moderated by deception. Deceivers displayed increasing involvement across the first half of the interaction, a pattern indicative of approach behavior and which seemed to allow them to better approximate truthteller behavior. In response to changes in receiver behavior, a general pattern of reciprocity emerged in deceptive and truthful interactions, with senders responding in kind to changes in receiver behavior; however, deceivers appear to have been somewhat less responsive than truthtellers to changes in receiver behavior. Finally, results revealed that partner behavior is an important source of information for evaluating one's own performance during interaction. The implications of these findings for Interpersonal Deception Theory and Interaction Adaptation Theory are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Burgoon, Judee K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAdaptation and communicative design: Patterns of interaction in deceptive and truthful interchanges.en_US
dc.creatorWhite, Cindy Hagemeier.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Cindy Hagemeier.en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo theoretical frameworks which examine the nature of adaptability and mutual influence in interaction, Interpersonal Deception Theory and Interaction Adaptation Theory, were used to derive hypothesis concerning the patterns of adjustment and accommodation in communication style that occur across time in face-to-face deceptive and truthful interactions. Specifically, these theories provided predictions concerning the influence of deception on communicators' needs, expections and desires, initial behavior in face-to-face interaction, the patterns of interaction that emerge between senders and receivers such as reciprocity and compensation, and the impact of behavior on evaluation of communicative effectiveness. Two experimental studies were conducted in which senders were either truthful or deceptive in their interactions with a partner. The first study, which included 48 same-sex dyads, provided information about the influence of needs, expectations, and desires on initial behavior and about the influence of interaction on these same factors. The second study, which included 48 same-sex dyads, involved a longer interaction in which receivers altered their behavior by increasing of decreasing conversational involvement, in order to examine the patterns of interaction that emerged across time. Results revealed that deceivers felt more anxious and were more concerned about self-presentation than truthtellers prior to the interaction. These differences were reflected in initial behavior, with deceivers displaying less conversational involvement than truthtellers. Patterns of interaction were also moderated by deception. Deceivers displayed increasing involvement across the first half of the interaction, a pattern indicative of approach behavior and which seemed to allow them to better approximate truthteller behavior. In response to changes in receiver behavior, a general pattern of reciprocity emerged in deceptive and truthful interactions, with senders responding in kind to changes in receiver behavior; however, deceivers appear to have been somewhat less responsive than truthtellers to changes in receiver behavior. Finally, results revealed that partner behavior is an important source of information for evaluating one's own performance during interaction. The implications of these findings for Interpersonal Deception Theory and Interaction Adaptation Theory are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJackson, Sallyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBuller, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRidley, Carlen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorrill, Calvinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9626561en_US
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