COMPUTER CONTROLLED LASER OPTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY FOR TRACE GAS ANALYSIS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187515
Title:
COMPUTER CONTROLLED LASER OPTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY FOR TRACE GAS ANALYSIS.
Author:
TILDEN, SCOTT BRADLEY.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Optoacoustic spectroscopy is a relatively old technique first described by Alexander Graham Bell in 1881. However, over the intervening years, little use was made of the technique due to its low sensitivity. This was due to low source intensities of available infrared light sources which limited the optoacoustic signal strength. With the advent of laser infrared light sources in the 1960's, there has been a resurgence of interest in optoacoustics. No longer is low source intensity a major limitation to successful optoacoustic spectroscopy. Although adequate infrared light sources are available, the large window background signal observed in all optoacoustic systems has been the major limitation in extending trace gas detection limits to the ppb or sub-ppb level. Similarly, there has been little demonstration of the use of the optoacoustic technique in environments where mixtures of gases are present which have severe spectral overlap. This work will discuss a new windowless cell design that largely eliminates the signal background problem ubiquitous to all presently available optoacoustic cells. New methodologies will be discussed that allow analyses of mixtures to be performed even in cases where spectral overlap is severe. Limitations to both the windowless cell and the various multicomponent analysis strategies are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Laser spectroscopy -- Data processing.; Optoacoustic spectroscopy -- Data processing.; Trace elements -- Analysis.; Trace elements -- Spectra.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCOMPUTER CONTROLLED LASER OPTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY FOR TRACE GAS ANALYSIS.en_US
dc.creatorTILDEN, SCOTT BRADLEY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTILDEN, SCOTT BRADLEY.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOptoacoustic spectroscopy is a relatively old technique first described by Alexander Graham Bell in 1881. However, over the intervening years, little use was made of the technique due to its low sensitivity. This was due to low source intensities of available infrared light sources which limited the optoacoustic signal strength. With the advent of laser infrared light sources in the 1960's, there has been a resurgence of interest in optoacoustics. No longer is low source intensity a major limitation to successful optoacoustic spectroscopy. Although adequate infrared light sources are available, the large window background signal observed in all optoacoustic systems has been the major limitation in extending trace gas detection limits to the ppb or sub-ppb level. Similarly, there has been little demonstration of the use of the optoacoustic technique in environments where mixtures of gases are present which have severe spectral overlap. This work will discuss a new windowless cell design that largely eliminates the signal background problem ubiquitous to all presently available optoacoustic cells. New methodologies will be discussed that allow analyses of mixtures to be performed even in cases where spectral overlap is severe. Limitations to both the windowless cell and the various multicomponent analysis strategies are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLaser spectroscopy -- Data processing.en_US
dc.subjectOptoacoustic spectroscopy -- Data processing.en_US
dc.subjectTrace elements -- Analysis.en_US
dc.subjectTrace elements -- Spectra.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8401276en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690221434en_US
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