Are university students better prepared for higher education than are community college students?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187513
Title:
Are university students better prepared for higher education than are community college students?
Author:
Law, Claude James.
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was undertaken with the primary objective of determining whether community college students were as well prepared for success in higher education as students who began their advance training in a university. A relatively small southwestern state university and an adjacent community college were chosen as the site for this study. Classes at each institution were selected on the basis of content similarity given the fact that no two classes were exactly alike. The study then examined the differences and similarities between the course content and the students in them. The primary focus was on the students, first to determine if the respective groups from the community college and from the university represented the same or different populations. Criteria for this aspect of the study included social characteristics, performance, motivation and aspirations. Demographic data were also gathered to provide a general basis upon which to make a comparative analysis of the participants. The respective learning environments were then examined for comparability of content, teaching styles, bias and others. Significant similarity was found in a number of criteria, but it was clear that community college students generally came from a lower class, did less well in high school and seemed to improve rapidly. However, without further analysis it cannot be determined if the community college students are capable of survival in the academic environment of a university. Competency exams in the academic areas are suggested as a method of validating the knowledge and preparation of the community college students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Slaughter, Sheila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAre university students better prepared for higher education than are community college students?en_US
dc.creatorLaw, Claude James.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Claude James.en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was undertaken with the primary objective of determining whether community college students were as well prepared for success in higher education as students who began their advance training in a university. A relatively small southwestern state university and an adjacent community college were chosen as the site for this study. Classes at each institution were selected on the basis of content similarity given the fact that no two classes were exactly alike. The study then examined the differences and similarities between the course content and the students in them. The primary focus was on the students, first to determine if the respective groups from the community college and from the university represented the same or different populations. Criteria for this aspect of the study included social characteristics, performance, motivation and aspirations. Demographic data were also gathered to provide a general basis upon which to make a comparative analysis of the participants. The respective learning environments were then examined for comparability of content, teaching styles, bias and others. Significant similarity was found in a number of criteria, but it was clear that community college students generally came from a lower class, did less well in high school and seemed to improve rapidly. However, without further analysis it cannot be determined if the community college students are capable of survival in the academic environment of a university. Competency exams in the academic areas are suggested as a method of validating the knowledge and preparation of the community college students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLevin, John S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9626556en_US
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