Collaborative retrospective miscue analysis: Implementation of an instructional tool to revalue fourth-grade readers in trouble.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187499
Title:
Collaborative retrospective miscue analysis: Implementation of an instructional tool to revalue fourth-grade readers in trouble.
Author:
Brown, Elizabeth Ann Duell.
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Collaborative Retrospective Miscue Analysis (CRMA) is an instructional strategy designed to assist readers who are struggling with reading within the school environment. Procedures include the administration of the Reading Interview at four intervals, the creation of a baseline Reader Profile for each troubled reader using the Reading Miscue Inventory Procedure I, and the use of audiotapes of participants reading during a group discussion of the readers' miscues. The research group was composed of 4 girls. The research design incorporated individual case studies of two readers designated as troubled and a separate case study of the group interaction. A total of 15 discussions focused on 5 different audiotapes of each of the troubled readers. The researcher stayed with the group during the first 11 sessions, facilitating the introduction of terminology, and helping the group develop new understandings of the reading process. Transactional socio-psycholinguistic reading process was introduced using appropriate terminology for fourth graders, and the group was encouraged to help the troubled readers focus on meaning. Time was spent helping each reader develop positive strategies to move them toward the creation of meaningful text. Each discussion was audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed for topics focused on monitoring text for meaning and building positive self-images. Changes in self-esteem and reading performance as measured by the Reading Miscue Inventory: Procedure I were analyzed Statistics are displayed through a reader profile based on the Procedure I Inventory and analysis of changes in responses to the reading interview. Research findings indicate that each troubled reader was able to significantly improve her meaning construction, experience positive changes in self-esteem, and define her concept of reading as bringing meaning to text through personal transaction.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading, and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Goodman, Yetta M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCollaborative retrospective miscue analysis: Implementation of an instructional tool to revalue fourth-grade readers in trouble.en_US
dc.creatorBrown, Elizabeth Ann Duell.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Elizabeth Ann Duell.en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCollaborative Retrospective Miscue Analysis (CRMA) is an instructional strategy designed to assist readers who are struggling with reading within the school environment. Procedures include the administration of the Reading Interview at four intervals, the creation of a baseline Reader Profile for each troubled reader using the Reading Miscue Inventory Procedure I, and the use of audiotapes of participants reading during a group discussion of the readers' miscues. The research group was composed of 4 girls. The research design incorporated individual case studies of two readers designated as troubled and a separate case study of the group interaction. A total of 15 discussions focused on 5 different audiotapes of each of the troubled readers. The researcher stayed with the group during the first 11 sessions, facilitating the introduction of terminology, and helping the group develop new understandings of the reading process. Transactional socio-psycholinguistic reading process was introduced using appropriate terminology for fourth graders, and the group was encouraged to help the troubled readers focus on meaning. Time was spent helping each reader develop positive strategies to move them toward the creation of meaningful text. Each discussion was audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed for topics focused on monitoring text for meaning and building positive self-images. Changes in self-esteem and reading performance as measured by the Reading Miscue Inventory: Procedure I were analyzed Statistics are displayed through a reader profile based on the Procedure I Inventory and analysis of changes in responses to the reading interview. Research findings indicate that each troubled reader was able to significantly improve her meaning construction, experience positive changes in self-esteem, and define her concept of reading as bringing meaning to text through personal transaction.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 335 missing from paper original and microfilm version.-
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading, and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Kenneth S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarek, Ann M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFox, Danaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9626537en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.