An application of adolescent ego-development theory to a parenting model in the examination of failure to thrive.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187462
Title:
An application of adolescent ego-development theory to a parenting model in the examination of failure to thrive.
Author:
Callor, Suzanne.
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examined the processes underlying mother-child relationship disturbances among families who had a child with failure to thrive. Belsky's (1984) model of the determinants of parenting was utilized to determine the constructs important in understanding the parenting process. These constructs included mothers' remembered developmental history, personal psychological resources, and the reported difficulty of their child. Adolescent ego-development theory was used to identify the personal psychological resources of the mother. Two samples were used to examine mother-child relationship disturbances, mothers of failure to thrive children (N = 26) and mothers of comparison children (N = 24). The findings were: (1) Remembered developmental history of respondents predicted psychosocial health and individuation in mothers from both groups; (2) Remembered developmental history predicted sense of identity in the failure to thrive group and autonomy in the comparison group; (3) Identity and psychosocial health predicted maternal distress in the failure to thrive group; and (4) Identity and child difficulty predicted mother-child relationship disturbances in both groups. Logistic regression revealed that mothers who rated their children as more difficult were 16 times more likely to have a child with failure to thrive.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family and Consumer Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gamble, Wendy C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn application of adolescent ego-development theory to a parenting model in the examination of failure to thrive.en_US
dc.creatorCallor, Suzanne.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCallor, Suzanne.en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examined the processes underlying mother-child relationship disturbances among families who had a child with failure to thrive. Belsky's (1984) model of the determinants of parenting was utilized to determine the constructs important in understanding the parenting process. These constructs included mothers' remembered developmental history, personal psychological resources, and the reported difficulty of their child. Adolescent ego-development theory was used to identify the personal psychological resources of the mother. Two samples were used to examine mother-child relationship disturbances, mothers of failure to thrive children (N = 26) and mothers of comparison children (N = 24). The findings were: (1) Remembered developmental history of respondents predicted psychosocial health and individuation in mothers from both groups; (2) Remembered developmental history predicted sense of identity in the failure to thrive group and autonomy in the comparison group; (3) Identity and psychosocial health predicted maternal distress in the failure to thrive group; and (4) Identity and child difficulty predicted mother-child relationship disturbances in both groups. Logistic regression revealed that mothers who rated their children as more difficult were 16 times more likely to have a child with failure to thrive.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGamble, Wendy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTaylor, Angelaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetts, Sherry C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBinkiewicz, Annaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9626482en_US
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