Dark mirror: Constructions of the femme fatale in Weimar film and Hollywood film noir.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187445
Title:
Dark mirror: Constructions of the femme fatale in Weimar film and Hollywood film noir.
Author:
Hales, Barbara.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The femme fatale is a marker for the past is evident in the film noir work of German exile directors. These directors created a femme fatale character similar to Weimar examples of the sexual woman icon, using Weimar cultural constructions as a template for their work in Hollywood. The femme fatale figure in film noir is specifically an enigma or duplicitous mystery, a woman with a gun who threatens the male protagonist. She represents a piece of the male character's past often seen through the structure of the voice-over and flashback. These narrative devices enable the male protagonist to rework this jaded past vis-a-vis his relationship to the femme fatale and his fatal attraction to her. The film noir femme fatale is linked to German exile directors' desire to review a past that has been lost and cannot be recuperated. In the case of the Weimar femme fatale, she is a sign for the trauma of World War I and the ensuing political/social crises of the Weimar republic. The femme fatale in her castrating capacity is a marker for historical upheaval and male subjectivity in flux. She is ultimately the scapegoat for male questions of self and a split subjectivity brought on by historical events such as war and the experience of exile. Her various guises include the criminal woman, the technological entity, and the double.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
European fiction -- History and criticism.; Germanic literature.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Kosta, Barbara

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDark mirror: Constructions of the femme fatale in Weimar film and Hollywood film noir.en_US
dc.creatorHales, Barbara.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHales, Barbara.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe femme fatale is a marker for the past is evident in the film noir work of German exile directors. These directors created a femme fatale character similar to Weimar examples of the sexual woman icon, using Weimar cultural constructions as a template for their work in Hollywood. The femme fatale figure in film noir is specifically an enigma or duplicitous mystery, a woman with a gun who threatens the male protagonist. She represents a piece of the male character's past often seen through the structure of the voice-over and flashback. These narrative devices enable the male protagonist to rework this jaded past vis-a-vis his relationship to the femme fatale and his fatal attraction to her. The film noir femme fatale is linked to German exile directors' desire to review a past that has been lost and cannot be recuperated. In the case of the Weimar femme fatale, she is a sign for the trauma of World War I and the ensuing political/social crises of the Weimar republic. The femme fatale in her castrating capacity is a marker for historical upheaval and male subjectivity in flux. She is ultimately the scapegoat for male questions of self and a split subjectivity brought on by historical events such as war and the experience of exile. Her various guises include the criminal woman, the technological entity, and the double.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEuropean fiction -- History and criticism.en_US
dc.subjectGermanic literature.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparative Cultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKosta, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCanfield, Dougen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFoley, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhite, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBabcock, Barbaraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9624150en_US
dc.identifier.oclc707939483en_US
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