Sonata No. 2 in F Sharp Minor, Op. 13 by Nikolai Yakovlevich Miaskovsky: A detailed analysis and comparative study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187444
Title:
Sonata No. 2 in F Sharp Minor, Op. 13 by Nikolai Yakovlevich Miaskovsky: A detailed analysis and comparative study.
Author:
Haeseler, Lynn Cheryl.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study introduces the nine piano sonatas by Nikolai Yakovlevich Miaskovsky. A detailed description and analysis of Sonata No. 2 in f# minor is also included, as well as a copy of the full score. Even though he composed twenty-seven symphonies, a number of string quartets and a variety of piano works, Miaskovsky and his compositions are relatively unknown in the United States. The magnitude of his symphonic works, the isolationist policies of the Soviet Union, and a language barrier may explain this obscurity. His piano sonatas have been especially and unjustifiably overlooked. In his early sonatas, Miaskovsky uses the piano as a symphonic medium. These sonatas are technically challenging, extensive in dynamic range and color. Their chromatic texture and extended harmonies reflect the compositional style of Alexander Scriabin and Richard Strauss. The Sonata No. 2 in f# minor in particular exemplifies Miaskovsky's exploration of modernism with an inclination toward late romantic traditions. This sonata especially shows Miaskovsky's struggle to establish a personal musical style and demonstrates his remarkable craftsmanship. A study of Miaskovsky's piano sonatas reveals a stylistic evolution from somber subjectivity to a less personalized style. The vast difference in his later sonatas (nos. 7-9) suggests that Miaskovsky complied with the ideological demands of the Soviet state. Miaskovsky's lifetime and musical development uniquely reflect the momentous events in Russian and Soviet history. As a prominent composer in Russia, his recognition is long overdue in the United States. His early sonatas especially deserve a place in the standard twentieth-century piano literature.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music and Dance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Zumbro, Nicholas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSonata No. 2 in F Sharp Minor, Op. 13 by Nikolai Yakovlevich Miaskovsky: A detailed analysis and comparative study.en_US
dc.creatorHaeseler, Lynn Cheryl.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHaeseler, Lynn Cheryl.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study introduces the nine piano sonatas by Nikolai Yakovlevich Miaskovsky. A detailed description and analysis of Sonata No. 2 in f# minor is also included, as well as a copy of the full score. Even though he composed twenty-seven symphonies, a number of string quartets and a variety of piano works, Miaskovsky and his compositions are relatively unknown in the United States. The magnitude of his symphonic works, the isolationist policies of the Soviet Union, and a language barrier may explain this obscurity. His piano sonatas have been especially and unjustifiably overlooked. In his early sonatas, Miaskovsky uses the piano as a symphonic medium. These sonatas are technically challenging, extensive in dynamic range and color. Their chromatic texture and extended harmonies reflect the compositional style of Alexander Scriabin and Richard Strauss. The Sonata No. 2 in f# minor in particular exemplifies Miaskovsky's exploration of modernism with an inclination toward late romantic traditions. This sonata especially shows Miaskovsky's struggle to establish a personal musical style and demonstrates his remarkable craftsmanship. A study of Miaskovsky's piano sonatas reveals a stylistic evolution from somber subjectivity to a less personalized style. The vast difference in his later sonatas (nos. 7-9) suggests that Miaskovsky complied with the ideological demands of the Soviet state. Miaskovsky's lifetime and musical development uniquely reflect the momentous events in Russian and Soviet history. As a prominent composer in Russia, his recognition is long overdue in the United States. His early sonatas especially deserve a place in the standard twentieth-century piano literature.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairZumbro, Nicholasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFan, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWoods, Rexen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9624149en_US
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