A constructivist approach to evaluation methodology: Implications for positive youth development.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187422
Title:
A constructivist approach to evaluation methodology: Implications for positive youth development.
Author:
Huebner, Angela Jean.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to employ Fourth Generation Evaluation, a constructivist methodology, to an examination of the concept of positive youth development. To accomplish this task, four groups of stakeholders in the process of positive youth development in an urban, southwestern city were included: (1) teens; (2) parents; (3) school personnel; and (4) community members. Ten men and ten women were included. As a process, Fourth Generation Evaluation proved to be a worthwhile strategy for examining the concept of positive youth development. This strategy revealed that stakeholders agree that positive youth development means helping young people to develop competence as well as attitudes and qualities associated with resiliency. Fourth Generation Evaluation was particularly useful in uncovering important information about context as it defines the parameters of resiliency and protective factors. Incorporating the concept of positive youth development with resiliency provides 11 powerful theoretical basis for prevention and promotion programs. This strategy also raises some interesting ethical dilemmas regarding the inclusion of stakeholders and programmatic decisions. Such a strategy should be incorporated prior to the implementation of any programs focusing on positive youth development. This strategy helps to ensure that stakeholder expectations are met and that the program has support from its inception. This support is vital to insure program success.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family and Consumer Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Betts, Sherry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA constructivist approach to evaluation methodology: Implications for positive youth development.en_US
dc.creatorHuebner, Angela Jean.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHuebner, Angela Jean.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to employ Fourth Generation Evaluation, a constructivist methodology, to an examination of the concept of positive youth development. To accomplish this task, four groups of stakeholders in the process of positive youth development in an urban, southwestern city were included: (1) teens; (2) parents; (3) school personnel; and (4) community members. Ten men and ten women were included. As a process, Fourth Generation Evaluation proved to be a worthwhile strategy for examining the concept of positive youth development. This strategy revealed that stakeholders agree that positive youth development means helping young people to develop competence as well as attitudes and qualities associated with resiliency. Fourth Generation Evaluation was particularly useful in uncovering important information about context as it defines the parameters of resiliency and protective factors. Incorporating the concept of positive youth development with resiliency provides 11 powerful theoretical basis for prevention and promotion programs. This strategy also raises some interesting ethical dilemmas regarding the inclusion of stakeholders and programmatic decisions. Such a strategy should be incorporated prior to the implementation of any programs focusing on positive youth development. This strategy helps to ensure that stakeholder expectations are met and that the program has support from its inception. This support is vital to insure program success.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBetts, Sherryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGamble, Wendy C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSilverberg, Sue B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9623315en_US
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