Identifiers of Spanish-speaking children with language impairment who are learning English as a second language.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187403
Title:
Identifiers of Spanish-speaking children with language impairment who are learning English as a second language.
Author:
Restrepo, Maria Adelaida.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study identified a set of measures that accurately and efficiently discriminated between predominantly Spanish-speaking children with normal language and with language impairment. Twenty-one 5- to 7-year-old children with normal language and 21 with language impairment, matched for age, gender, and school were studied. Each child responded to a set of verbal and nonverbal measures. The verbal measures assessed vocabulary and bound-morpheme learning skills, spontaneous language form, and responses to a standardized language test. The nonverbal measures assessed nonverbal intelligence, spatial-rotation, and motor-sequential skills. In addition, the children's parents participated in an interview to describe the child's current speech, language, and learning skills; and to report family history of speech, language, and academic problems. The results of a stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that four measures accounted for 79% of the variance of the model (p < .0001). This four-measure discriminant model had a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 100%. The measures that contributed to the discriminant model were: parental report of the child's current speech, language, and learning problems; number of errors per terminable unit; family history of speech, language, or academic problems; and mean length of terminable unit. An additional discriminant analysis indicated that the same level of discriminant accuracy could be maintained with the two measures that accounted for the most variance in the four-measure model: parental report of speech and language problems, and number of errors per terminable unit. Confirmatory discriminant analyses of the two-measure and four-measure models indicated that the results were stable across an independent sample. This study underscores the need for data-based approaches to the identification of Spanish-speaking children with language impairment, and the contributions of standard evaluations procedures to the identification of these children: parent interview and language-form analysis. In addition, the findings of this study indicate that a language-form deficit characterized by morphosyntactic difficulties and a high prevalence of family history of speech and language problems characterize children with language impairment regardless of the languages they speak.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Speech and Hearing Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Swisher, Linda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIdentifiers of Spanish-speaking children with language impairment who are learning English as a second language.en_US
dc.creatorRestrepo, Maria Adelaida.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRestrepo, Maria Adelaida.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study identified a set of measures that accurately and efficiently discriminated between predominantly Spanish-speaking children with normal language and with language impairment. Twenty-one 5- to 7-year-old children with normal language and 21 with language impairment, matched for age, gender, and school were studied. Each child responded to a set of verbal and nonverbal measures. The verbal measures assessed vocabulary and bound-morpheme learning skills, spontaneous language form, and responses to a standardized language test. The nonverbal measures assessed nonverbal intelligence, spatial-rotation, and motor-sequential skills. In addition, the children's parents participated in an interview to describe the child's current speech, language, and learning skills; and to report family history of speech, language, and academic problems. The results of a stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that four measures accounted for 79% of the variance of the model (p < .0001). This four-measure discriminant model had a sensitivity of 91.3% and a specificity of 100%. The measures that contributed to the discriminant model were: parental report of the child's current speech, language, and learning problems; number of errors per terminable unit; family history of speech, language, or academic problems; and mean length of terminable unit. An additional discriminant analysis indicated that the same level of discriminant accuracy could be maintained with the two measures that accounted for the most variance in the four-measure model: parental report of speech and language problems, and number of errors per terminable unit. Confirmatory discriminant analyses of the two-measure and four-measure models indicated that the results were stable across an independent sample. This study underscores the need for data-based approaches to the identification of Spanish-speaking children with language impairment, and the contributions of standard evaluations procedures to the identification of these children: parent interview and language-form analysis. In addition, the findings of this study indicate that a language-form deficit characterized by morphosyntactic difficulties and a high prevalence of family history of speech and language problems characterize children with language impairment regardless of the languages they speak.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSwisher, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlattke, Theodoreen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPlante, Elenaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaville-Troike, Murielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Donnaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9622979en_US
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