When East European communist regimes fall China still stands: A comparative study of regime legitimacy.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187387
Title:
When East European communist regimes fall China still stands: A comparative study of regime legitimacy.
Author:
Mao, Kristina Sie.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation seeks to answer the question: "Why did East European communist regimes fall but the Chinese communist regime, despite similar shocks at that same time, still stands?" It examines the roles of Marxism, Leninism, nationalism, and the traditional cultures of each the nine countries, in their recent crises of legitimacy. The principal findings are that all the following factors help to explain the successes or failures of these regimes in maintaining their legitimacy: (1) systematic differences between East European communist countries and China in the traditional religious beliefs and practices; (2) systematic differences between East European countries and China in the affective bases of their political communities; (3) systematic differences in their economic relationships within East European countries and China; and, (4) systematic differences in social relationships and political systems of East European communist countries and China, all contributed to the differences in the legitimacy of these nine communist regimes. In addition, the thesis also found that effectiveness of government performance can be an important factor in maintaining regime legitimacy.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Whiting, Allen S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWhen East European communist regimes fall China still stands: A comparative study of regime legitimacy.en_US
dc.creatorMao, Kristina Sie.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMao, Kristina Sie.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation seeks to answer the question: "Why did East European communist regimes fall but the Chinese communist regime, despite similar shocks at that same time, still stands?" It examines the roles of Marxism, Leninism, nationalism, and the traditional cultures of each the nine countries, in their recent crises of legitimacy. The principal findings are that all the following factors help to explain the successes or failures of these regimes in maintaining their legitimacy: (1) systematic differences between East European communist countries and China in the traditional religious beliefs and practices; (2) systematic differences between East European countries and China in the affective bases of their political communities; (3) systematic differences in their economic relationships within East European countries and China; and, (4) systematic differences in social relationships and political systems of East European communist countries and China, all contributed to the differences in the legitimacy of these nine communist regimes. In addition, the thesis also found that effectiveness of government performance can be an important factor in maintaining regime legitimacy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWhiting, Allen S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWahlke, John C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWillerton, John P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620443en_US
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