Internal crises, external dependence, and democratic stability and instability in the developing world: A comparative study of Brazil and India.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187384
Title:
Internal crises, external dependence, and democratic stability and instability in the developing world: A comparative study of Brazil and India.
Author:
Kabir, Bhuian Md. Monoar.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explains the reasons for democratic stability and breakdown in two industrially advanced developing countries, India and Brazil. Arguments of this dissertation have been derived from econo-military dependency, economic development, and civil-military relations perspectives. None of the existing explanations for stability of the Indian democracy and the 1964 breakdown of the Brazilian democracy has made any conscious attempt to combine both internal and external variables. Modifying the existing mono-causal explanations, this dissertation argues that a combination of such variables as econo-military dependence on the United States, aid dependence on the United States and multilateral financial institutions, role of the military and the counter-hegemonic forces account for most of the variations between the two cases.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Democratization -- Developing countries.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
William, Edward J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInternal crises, external dependence, and democratic stability and instability in the developing world: A comparative study of Brazil and India.en_US
dc.creatorKabir, Bhuian Md. Monoar.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKabir, Bhuian Md. Monoar.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explains the reasons for democratic stability and breakdown in two industrially advanced developing countries, India and Brazil. Arguments of this dissertation have been derived from econo-military dependency, economic development, and civil-military relations perspectives. None of the existing explanations for stability of the Indian democracy and the 1964 breakdown of the Brazilian democracy has made any conscious attempt to combine both internal and external variables. Modifying the existing mono-causal explanations, this dissertation argues that a combination of such variables as econo-military dependence on the United States, aid dependence on the United States and multilateral financial institutions, role of the military and the counter-hegemonic forces account for most of the variations between the two cases.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDemocratization -- Developing countries.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWilliam, Edward J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGibbs, David N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Neil, Daniel J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620440en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706832737en_US
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