Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187367
Title:
A phylogenetic analysis of the Accipitridae (class Aves).
Author:
Sheehy, Robert Rowland.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The avian family Accipitridae is a large, diverse family composed of approximately 230 species divided into 56 genera. The evolutionary relationships among Acciptrid taxa have been examined previously using phenetic and parsimony approaches and a variety of data sets. These studies have resulted in conflicting phylogenies, presumably due to the high level of homoplasy, perhaps, the result of convergence on diet. To develop a firm understanding of the relationships among the major species groups (i.e., morphological types) an analysis of DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial encoded cytochrome-b gene was undertaken. Parsimony, distance and maximum likelihood methods were used to explore the phylogenetic relationships among the Accipitridae. Major findings of the molecular study includes support for the polyphyly of the Kite genera and the sister group relationship of the Osprey (Pandion) with Acciptrid taxa. Evidence based on branch length analysis suggest one or two of periods of rapid morphological diversification. Osteological characters from 44 genera were analyzed alone, and in concert with molecular data. These data yielded phylogenetic trees that were very similar to those trees produced solely by the molecular data. Statistical support for the osteological tree, as demonstrated by bootstrap values, was very weak; supporting, only partially, the clade of old world vultures (Aegypiinae). The phylogenetic signal contained in the osteological data set was estimated using the g1 statistic determined from random tree length distributions. G1 values were found to be dependent on the frequency distribution of character states. Analysis of the g1 statistic from native and shuffled data sets was found to be a less biased method of examining a data set for phylogenetic signal. Divergence times estimated from branch lengths suggest that the Accipitridae diverged from other diurnal raptors approximately 75 million years ago. Clades representing the major morphological diversity among the Accipitridae diverged about 40 million years ago over a period of approximately 7 million years.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Genetics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Oishi, Karen K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA phylogenetic analysis of the Accipitridae (class Aves).en_US
dc.creatorSheehy, Robert Rowland.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSheehy, Robert Rowland.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe avian family Accipitridae is a large, diverse family composed of approximately 230 species divided into 56 genera. The evolutionary relationships among Acciptrid taxa have been examined previously using phenetic and parsimony approaches and a variety of data sets. These studies have resulted in conflicting phylogenies, presumably due to the high level of homoplasy, perhaps, the result of convergence on diet. To develop a firm understanding of the relationships among the major species groups (i.e., morphological types) an analysis of DNA sequence data from the mitochondrial encoded cytochrome-b gene was undertaken. Parsimony, distance and maximum likelihood methods were used to explore the phylogenetic relationships among the Accipitridae. Major findings of the molecular study includes support for the polyphyly of the Kite genera and the sister group relationship of the Osprey (Pandion) with Acciptrid taxa. Evidence based on branch length analysis suggest one or two of periods of rapid morphological diversification. Osteological characters from 44 genera were analyzed alone, and in concert with molecular data. These data yielded phylogenetic trees that were very similar to those trees produced solely by the molecular data. Statistical support for the osteological tree, as demonstrated by bootstrap values, was very weak; supporting, only partially, the clade of old world vultures (Aegypiinae). The phylogenetic signal contained in the osteological data set was estimated using the g1 statistic determined from random tree length distributions. G1 values were found to be dependent on the frequency distribution of character states. Analysis of the g1 statistic from native and shuffled data sets was found to be a less biased method of examining a data set for phylogenetic signal. Divergence times estimated from branch lengths suggest that the Accipitridae diverged from other diurnal raptors approximately 75 million years ago. Clades representing the major morphological diversity among the Accipitridae diverged about 40 million years ago over a period of approximately 7 million years.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p.55 and p.260 missing from paper original; appears to be pagination error rather than missing content.en
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeneticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairOishi, Karen K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKidwell, Margaret G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeed, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaddison, Wayne P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalsh, J. Bruceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620425en_US
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