Perceptions of faculty evaluations programs in Israel and the United States.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187355
Title:
Perceptions of faculty evaluations programs in Israel and the United States.
Author:
Neuman, Yael Berta
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines perceptions of faculty and administrators in Israeli institutions of higher education about their faculty evaluation programs, and compares them with perceptions of colleagues in comparable United States institutions. A written survey conducted among faculty and administrators in Israel was compared to similar data previously collected in the United States. Responses indicate that faculty roles are valued somewhat differently in Israel and the United States, but that faculty and administrators in both countries consider faculty evaluation to be important for the selection, promotion, tenure, and development of faculty. Yet, many are unclear about how the process of faculty evaluation operates and question whether it is always put to good use. Widely shared perceptions are that evaluation policies are often ambiguous and devoid of clearly articulated guiding principles; that evaluation procedures tend to lack consistency and fairness; and that their results do not always justify the effort. There is general agreement that the faculty evaluation process needs to be improved, but uncertainty about whether administrative support or resources could be elicited. Few believe that the evaluation is used efficiently to help faculty develop and improve their academic skills. The dissertation concludes with recommendations that might help remedy this situation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
College teachers -- Israel.; College teachers -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Aleamoni, Lawrence M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePerceptions of faculty evaluations programs in Israel and the United States.en_US
dc.creatorNeuman, Yael Bertaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNeuman, Yael Bertaen_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines perceptions of faculty and administrators in Israeli institutions of higher education about their faculty evaluation programs, and compares them with perceptions of colleagues in comparable United States institutions. A written survey conducted among faculty and administrators in Israel was compared to similar data previously collected in the United States. Responses indicate that faculty roles are valued somewhat differently in Israel and the United States, but that faculty and administrators in both countries consider faculty evaluation to be important for the selection, promotion, tenure, and development of faculty. Yet, many are unclear about how the process of faculty evaluation operates and question whether it is always put to good use. Widely shared perceptions are that evaluation policies are often ambiguous and devoid of clearly articulated guiding principles; that evaluation procedures tend to lack consistency and fairness; and that their results do not always justify the effort. There is general agreement that the faculty evaluation process needs to be improved, but uncertainty about whether administrative support or resources could be elicited. Few believe that the evaluation is used efficiently to help faculty develop and improve their academic skills. The dissertation concludes with recommendations that might help remedy this situation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCollege teachers -- Israel.en_US
dc.subjectCollege teachers -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620414en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706817756en_US
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