New detection techniques in high performance thin layer chromatography and related studies.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187353
Title:
New detection techniques in high performance thin layer chromatography and related studies.
Author:
Yeager, Barry Todd.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recently, high performance thin layer chromatography, or HPTLC has seen considerable growth as an analytical technique. Most often perceived as a semi-quantitative or preliminary technique, in reality HPTLC is an analytical technique in its own right. Modern instrumentation, improved stationary phases, and automated techniques have found their way into the realm of HPTLC, vastly improving the scope of the technique. Today, HPTLC is a very popular analytical technique, possessing many advantages such as ease of use, high throughput, high sensitivity, and low cost. HPTLC is also applicable to a wide variety of compounds in a wide variety of matricies. Despite these advantages, HPTLC has still not received the recognition it deserves as a true quantitative analytical technique. The following chapters will describe improvements in various stages of the technique. Chapter 1 will discuss the general theory behind HPTLC, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, as well as areas needing improvement. Chapter 2 will discuss a new application technique for HPTLC that greatly improves upon current methodologies for sample application. Chapters 3 and 4 will discuss a novel detection technique used to image the entire plate simultaneously and give excellent quantitative information of analytes on the HPTLC plate. Chapter 5 will discuss the use of an infrared focal plane array as a detection technique that gives both qualitative and quantitative information. Finally Chapter 6 will discuss the use of a CCD home video camera as an inexpensive alternative to scientifically operated CCD's.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Denton, M. Bonner

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNew detection techniques in high performance thin layer chromatography and related studies.en_US
dc.creatorYeager, Barry Todd.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYeager, Barry Todd.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecently, high performance thin layer chromatography, or HPTLC has seen considerable growth as an analytical technique. Most often perceived as a semi-quantitative or preliminary technique, in reality HPTLC is an analytical technique in its own right. Modern instrumentation, improved stationary phases, and automated techniques have found their way into the realm of HPTLC, vastly improving the scope of the technique. Today, HPTLC is a very popular analytical technique, possessing many advantages such as ease of use, high throughput, high sensitivity, and low cost. HPTLC is also applicable to a wide variety of compounds in a wide variety of matricies. Despite these advantages, HPTLC has still not received the recognition it deserves as a true quantitative analytical technique. The following chapters will describe improvements in various stages of the technique. Chapter 1 will discuss the general theory behind HPTLC, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, as well as areas needing improvement. Chapter 2 will discuss a new application technique for HPTLC that greatly improves upon current methodologies for sample application. Chapters 3 and 4 will discuss a novel detection technique used to image the entire plate simultaneously and give excellent quantitative information of analytes on the HPTLC plate. Chapter 5 will discuss the use of an infrared focal plane array as a detection technique that gives both qualitative and quantitative information. Finally Chapter 6 will discuss the use of a CCD home video camera as an inexpensive alternative to scientifically operated CCD's.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDenton, M. Bonneren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurke, Michael F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaavedra, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSalzman, Williamen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620412en_US
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