TESTING, MODELLING, AND APPLICATIONS OF INTERFACE BEHAVIOR IN DYNAMIC SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187337
Title:
TESTING, MODELLING, AND APPLICATIONS OF INTERFACE BEHAVIOR IN DYNAMIC SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.
Author:
DRUMM, ERIC CORMAN.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The behavior of the interface between dry Ottawa sand and concrete has been studied using a new device developed for the cyclic testing of interfaces and joints. The stress conditions existing in the test device are investigated using stress cell measurements and a two-dimensional finite element analysis. A series of cyclic displacement-controlled interface tests are described in which the behavior of the interface is found to be a function of the applied normal stress, the amplitude of the applied displacement, the density of the sand, and the number of applied loading cycles. The (secant) shear stiffness is shown to increase with number of loading cycles, corresponding to an increase in sand density. The results of the laboratory tests are used to determine the parameters for use in a Ramberg-Osgood model to describe the interface shear stress-deformation response. This model is shown to describe the hysteresis behavior of the interface as a function of normal stress, density, and number of loading cycles. The model is used to predict the results of cyclic direct shear tests, and was found to yield satisfactory results. The interface model is implemented in a dynamic one-dimensional finite element procedure in which the soil and interface response are represented by nonlinear springs attached to the nodal points. The finite element procedure is verified by solving some simple problems for which exact or closed-form solutions are available. The response of a stress-controlled sand-concrete interface test is then predicted using the FE procedure with the nonlinear sand-concrete interface model. Although the one-dimensional idealization is a gross approximation to the three-dimensional test condition, reasonable results are obtained. A pile subjected to a harmonic axial load is then analyzed. The computed response is compared to an analytical solution and the observed response of a test pile reported by others. The effects of including interface behavior is demonstrated by solving the pile problem with and without the nonlinear interface effects. The results of this research have provided an improved understanding of the cyclic behavior of dry sand-concrete interfaces. The cyclic behavior has been represented with a simplified model for which the parameters are easily determined from laboratory tests.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Soil dynamics.; Soil mechanics.; Soils -- Testing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTESTING, MODELLING, AND APPLICATIONS OF INTERFACE BEHAVIOR IN DYNAMIC SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.en_US
dc.creatorDRUMM, ERIC CORMAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDRUMM, ERIC CORMAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe behavior of the interface between dry Ottawa sand and concrete has been studied using a new device developed for the cyclic testing of interfaces and joints. The stress conditions existing in the test device are investigated using stress cell measurements and a two-dimensional finite element analysis. A series of cyclic displacement-controlled interface tests are described in which the behavior of the interface is found to be a function of the applied normal stress, the amplitude of the applied displacement, the density of the sand, and the number of applied loading cycles. The (secant) shear stiffness is shown to increase with number of loading cycles, corresponding to an increase in sand density. The results of the laboratory tests are used to determine the parameters for use in a Ramberg-Osgood model to describe the interface shear stress-deformation response. This model is shown to describe the hysteresis behavior of the interface as a function of normal stress, density, and number of loading cycles. The model is used to predict the results of cyclic direct shear tests, and was found to yield satisfactory results. The interface model is implemented in a dynamic one-dimensional finite element procedure in which the soil and interface response are represented by nonlinear springs attached to the nodal points. The finite element procedure is verified by solving some simple problems for which exact or closed-form solutions are available. The response of a stress-controlled sand-concrete interface test is then predicted using the FE procedure with the nonlinear sand-concrete interface model. Although the one-dimensional idealization is a gross approximation to the three-dimensional test condition, reasonable results are obtained. A pile subjected to a harmonic axial load is then analyzed. The computed response is compared to an analytical solution and the observed response of a test pile reported by others. The effects of including interface behavior is demonstrated by solving the pile problem with and without the nonlinear interface effects. The results of this research have provided an improved understanding of the cyclic behavior of dry sand-concrete interfaces. The cyclic behavior has been represented with a simplified model for which the parameters are easily determined from laboratory tests.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSoil dynamics.en_US
dc.subjectSoil mechanics.en_US
dc.subjectSoils -- Testing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaemen, J. J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeNatale, J. S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeemembervan Zyl, D. J. A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8401259en_US
dc.identifier.oclc690177222en_US
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