The relationship between bone mass, body composition, nutrient intake and physical activity level in healthy postmenopausal women.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187334
Title:
The relationship between bone mass, body composition, nutrient intake and physical activity level in healthy postmenopausal women.
Author:
Chen, Zhao.
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This one-year longitudinal study was designed to examine the association of changes in body composition, dietary factors, and physical activities on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) among healthy postmenopausal women (N = 53). Subjects were Caucasian women who were not taking hormone replacement therapy and were at least three years past menopause. Calcium supplementation (1000 mg/day) were given to all the women to ensure adequate calcium intakes. Their body composition, total and regional BMC and BMD were measured using Single Photon Absorptiometry and Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry. Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire and eight days dietary intake records were used to estimate nutrient intake. Physical activity was assessed by self-administrated physical activity questionnaires. Lean tissue mass (L TM) was a significant predictor for regional BMD and BMC (p<0.05). Changes in bone were correlated with each other at certain sites. Increased weight and BMI were associated with increased BMD and BMC at femoral sites (p<0.05). Changes in fat tissue mass (FTM) and %FTM significantly predicted changes in BMD and BMC (R² = 0.14 to 0.23). Saturated fat, dietary fiber and beta-carotene intakes positively, and protein intake negatively, contributed to changes in bone mass (p<0.05). Energy spend on low intensity activities had a negative relationship with change in lumbar BMD. Reduction of lumbar spine BMC was accelerated with increased time spent on non-weight bearing activities (p<0.05). Dietary factors and changes in body composition had ajoint-role in predicting changes in BMD and BMC.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Stini, William A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between bone mass, body composition, nutrient intake and physical activity level in healthy postmenopausal women.en_US
dc.creatorChen, Zhao.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zhao.en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis one-year longitudinal study was designed to examine the association of changes in body composition, dietary factors, and physical activities on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) among healthy postmenopausal women (N = 53). Subjects were Caucasian women who were not taking hormone replacement therapy and were at least three years past menopause. Calcium supplementation (1000 mg/day) were given to all the women to ensure adequate calcium intakes. Their body composition, total and regional BMC and BMD were measured using Single Photon Absorptiometry and Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry. Arizona Food Frequency Questionnaire and eight days dietary intake records were used to estimate nutrient intake. Physical activity was assessed by self-administrated physical activity questionnaires. Lean tissue mass (L TM) was a significant predictor for regional BMD and BMC (p<0.05). Changes in bone were correlated with each other at certain sites. Increased weight and BMI were associated with increased BMD and BMC at femoral sites (p<0.05). Changes in fat tissue mass (FTM) and %FTM significantly predicted changes in BMD and BMC (R² = 0.14 to 0.23). Saturated fat, dietary fiber and beta-carotene intakes positively, and protein intake negatively, contributed to changes in bone mass (p<0.05). Energy spend on low intensity activities had a negative relationship with change in lumbar BMD. Reduction of lumbar spine BMC was accelerated with increased time spent on non-weight bearing activities (p<0.05). Dietary factors and changes in body composition had ajoint-role in predicting changes in BMD and BMC.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairStini, William A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRitenbaugh, Cherylen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLohman, Timothy G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620394en_US
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