Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187327
Title:
Visual performance prediction using schematic eye models.
Author:
Schwiegerling, James Theodore.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of visual modeling is to predict the visual performance or a change in performance of an individual from a model of the human visual system. In designing a model of the human visual system, two distinct functions are considered. The first is the production of an image incident on the retina by the optical system of the eye, and the second is the conversion of this image into a perceived image by the retina and brain. The eye optics are evaluated using raytracing techniques familiar to the optical engineer. The effect of the retinal and brain function are combined with the raytracing results by analyzing the modulation of the retinal image. Each of these processes is important far evaluating the performance of the entire visual system. Techniques for converting the abstract system performance measures used by optical engineers into clinically-applicable measures such as visual acuity and contrast sensitivity are developed in this dissertation. Furthermore, a methodology for applying videokeratoscopic height data to the visual model is outlined. These tools are useful in modeling the visual effects of corrective lenses, ocular maladies and refractive surgeries. The modeling techniques are applied to examples of soft contact lenses, keratoconus, radial keratotomy, photorefractive keratectomy and automated lamellar keratoplasty. The modeling tools developed in this dissertation are meant to be general and modular. As improvements to the measurements of the properties and functionality of the various visual components are made, the new information can be incorporated into the visual system model. Furthermore, the examples discussed here represent only a small subset of the applications of the visual model. Additional ocular maladies and emerging refractive surgeries can be modeled as well.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Greivenkamp, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleVisual performance prediction using schematic eye models.en_US
dc.creatorSchwiegerling, James Theodore.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwiegerling, James Theodore.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of visual modeling is to predict the visual performance or a change in performance of an individual from a model of the human visual system. In designing a model of the human visual system, two distinct functions are considered. The first is the production of an image incident on the retina by the optical system of the eye, and the second is the conversion of this image into a perceived image by the retina and brain. The eye optics are evaluated using raytracing techniques familiar to the optical engineer. The effect of the retinal and brain function are combined with the raytracing results by analyzing the modulation of the retinal image. Each of these processes is important far evaluating the performance of the entire visual system. Techniques for converting the abstract system performance measures used by optical engineers into clinically-applicable measures such as visual acuity and contrast sensitivity are developed in this dissertation. Furthermore, a methodology for applying videokeratoscopic height data to the visual model is outlined. These tools are useful in modeling the visual effects of corrective lenses, ocular maladies and refractive surgeries. The modeling techniques are applied to examples of soft contact lenses, keratoconus, radial keratotomy, photorefractive keratectomy and automated lamellar keratoplasty. The modeling tools developed in this dissertation are meant to be general and modular. As improvements to the measurements of the properties and functionality of the various visual components are made, the new information can be incorporated into the visual system model. Furthermore, the examples discussed here represent only a small subset of the applications of the visual model. Additional ocular maladies and emerging refractive surgeries can be modeled as well.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGreivenkamp, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Joseph M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSnyder, Robert W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620387en_US
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