An empirical assessment of the factors affecting the diffusion of group support systems in organizations.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187310
Title:
An empirical assessment of the factors affecting the diffusion of group support systems in organizations.
Author:
Shepherd, Morgan Morrison.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Organizations are downsizing, challenging their employees to "do more with less." Projects teams and work groups being formed to accomplish this goal are being supported with a new type of technology called Group Support Systems (GSS). This research was concerned with determining the major factors that affect the diffusion of GSS in organizations. GroupSystems (GS) is the GSS that was researched. A survey methodology was used to collect data. The model for this research was developed from existing models in diffusion research, from prior MIS research on GroupSystems, and from prior MIS implementation research. The following independent variables were analyzed: the role of the internal champion, the role of the facilitator, average size of the work groups and the percentage of work that was handled by each work group, hourly charge for using GS, total amount of money invested in the technology, and the role of communication channels within the organization. The data were analyzed through four different regressions, with the same results being obtained each time. Significant relationships were found for the size of work groups, the hourly charge rate, and the amount spent on the technology; findings for the role of the facilitator were partially significant. The final regression was significant at the p<.001 level and accounted for over 58% of the model.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Communication in management.; Teams in the workplace.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nunamaker, J. F. Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn empirical assessment of the factors affecting the diffusion of group support systems in organizations.en_US
dc.creatorShepherd, Morgan Morrison.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Morgan Morrison.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOrganizations are downsizing, challenging their employees to "do more with less." Projects teams and work groups being formed to accomplish this goal are being supported with a new type of technology called Group Support Systems (GSS). This research was concerned with determining the major factors that affect the diffusion of GSS in organizations. GroupSystems (GS) is the GSS that was researched. A survey methodology was used to collect data. The model for this research was developed from existing models in diffusion research, from prior MIS research on GroupSystems, and from prior MIS implementation research. The following independent variables were analyzed: the role of the internal champion, the role of the facilitator, average size of the work groups and the percentage of work that was handled by each work group, hourly charge for using GS, total amount of money invested in the technology, and the role of communication channels within the organization. The data were analyzed through four different regressions, with the same results being obtained each time. Significant relationships were found for the size of work groups, the hourly charge rate, and the amount spent on the technology; findings for the role of the facilitator were partially significant. The final regression was significant at the p<.001 level and accounted for over 58% of the model.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCommunication in management.en_US
dc.subjectTeams in the workplace.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNunamaker, J. F. Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVogel, Douglas R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrwig, Richard E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeach, Lee Royen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGriffith, T. L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620371en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706823628en_US
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