Teacher evaluation: Perceptions of elementary school teachers and principals.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187302
Title:
Teacher evaluation: Perceptions of elementary school teachers and principals.
Author:
Schreiner, Deborah Jolyn.
Issue Date:
1995
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation was developed to examine the perceptions of elementary school teachers and their principals regarding teacher evaluation. The study gathered data concerning attitudes toward current evaluation practices as well as perceived ideal practices. A survey instrument was designed and distributed to elementary school teachers and principals in sex selected public school districts in a selected county in Arizona. A total of 159 teacher surveys and 11 principal surveys were used for the data analysis. The participants were asked to respond to 20 questions for both their current situation and perceived ideal situation of teacher evaluation. These responses were given on a five-point Likert scale and were used to define both an accountability scale and a professional growth scale for perceptions of teacher evaluation. In addition, three open-ended questions required brief written responses regarding strengths and weaknesses of the evaluation system in place in their district. Another eight questions collected demographic data. Both the t-test and the ANOVA were used to determine significant differences between the responses of the two groups. The results of this study revealed that teachers and principals agreed with each other's perceptions of accountability and professional growth as primary purposes of teacher evaluation. Contrasts were noted when responses for each group were compared between the real and ideal scales. Teachers and principals both indicated that an even stronger emphasis be given to accountability and growth. There was a significant difference found between teachers' ideal perception of their level of involvement in the development of evaluation procedures and their perception of the amount of involvement they currently experience. Significant differences were also found between teachers' perceived ideal and real levels of confidence in their evaluator's competence. Additionally, both groups indicated that including feedback from students and peers was a necessary but deficient component in teacher evaluation. Demographic variables had no significant influence on the perceptions of either teachers or principals with regard to teacher evaluation. Overall, both teachers and principals perceived their current evaluation procedures less favorably than their perceived ideal practices of evaluation. Teachers and principals appear eager to discuss and refine evaluation practices.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nelson, Lawrence O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTeacher evaluation: Perceptions of elementary school teachers and principals.en_US
dc.creatorSchreiner, Deborah Jolyn.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchreiner, Deborah Jolyn.en_US
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation was developed to examine the perceptions of elementary school teachers and their principals regarding teacher evaluation. The study gathered data concerning attitudes toward current evaluation practices as well as perceived ideal practices. A survey instrument was designed and distributed to elementary school teachers and principals in sex selected public school districts in a selected county in Arizona. A total of 159 teacher surveys and 11 principal surveys were used for the data analysis. The participants were asked to respond to 20 questions for both their current situation and perceived ideal situation of teacher evaluation. These responses were given on a five-point Likert scale and were used to define both an accountability scale and a professional growth scale for perceptions of teacher evaluation. In addition, three open-ended questions required brief written responses regarding strengths and weaknesses of the evaluation system in place in their district. Another eight questions collected demographic data. Both the t-test and the ANOVA were used to determine significant differences between the responses of the two groups. The results of this study revealed that teachers and principals agreed with each other's perceptions of accountability and professional growth as primary purposes of teacher evaluation. Contrasts were noted when responses for each group were compared between the real and ideal scales. Teachers and principals both indicated that an even stronger emphasis be given to accountability and growth. There was a significant difference found between teachers' ideal perception of their level of involvement in the development of evaluation procedures and their perception of the amount of involvement they currently experience. Significant differences were also found between teachers' perceived ideal and real levels of confidence in their evaluator's competence. Additionally, both groups indicated that including feedback from students and peers was a necessary but deficient component in teacher evaluation. Demographic variables had no significant influence on the perceptions of either teachers or principals with regard to teacher evaluation. Overall, both teachers and principals perceived their current evaluation procedures less favorably than their perceived ideal practices of evaluation. Teachers and principals appear eager to discuss and refine evaluation practices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNelson, Lawrence O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMedina, Marcello Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9620364en_US
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